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    1. Semi-n00b
      Join Date
      Apr 2nd, 2019
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      18
      07-01-2019 12:48 PM #1
      Mechatronics in my tropical country is quite an often and most scary problem in here. Some of it broke with only a few km, some of it have a quite long lifetime. I heard about recall regarding to this failure/defect product with the mecha. Several cases among my friends : 1T3 DQ200 broke at 90.000km., 1T2 DQ200 broke at 120.000km, 1T3 DQ200 at 20.000km, MK6 1.4TSI DQ200 broke at 15.000km while mine broke only one year after I purchase the vehicle(at arround 8.000 km. Of course I got the warranty for free.
      My question is, how many km normally is the lifetime of the mechatronics? My mechanic said to have a combination usage between manual and S mode will make the mecha lifetime longer. Is there any other tips to make the mecha life longer?
      Thank you.

      It's not a volkswagen, it's just a car
      Last edited by Streetrod60; 07-01-2019 at 12:50 PM.

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    3. Member
      Join Date
      Aug 15th, 2018
      Location
      Los Angeles, CA, USA
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      215
      07-02-2019 01:38 AM #2
      Change the fluid/filter as often as you can afford to.

    4. Semi-n00b
      Join Date
      Apr 2nd, 2019
      Posts
      18
      07-03-2019 09:56 AM #3
      Updates mecha problem from my friends : his mecha was broken at arround 120.000km lifetime in the highway. The car was not be able to move on D, S or manual. He towed the car to his home. Let the car sit for two days and do nothing to it. Suddenly after two days, the car back to normal. And he be able to run the car arround for two hours. Any toughts?

      It's not a volkswagen, it's just a car

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    6. Member
      Join Date
      Aug 15th, 2018
      Location
      Los Angeles, CA, USA
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      07-03-2019 09:07 PM #4
      The thing could have just oveheated and stopped working to prevent further damage. Once cooled down, it'll work again. Overheating is caused by clogged heat exchanger, too little/too much fluid, old fluid, or failed internal oil pump. There are circuit boards and solenoids inside the mechatronics. Many mechatronics failed because of the solenoids, and the circuit boards were updated in later versions.

      The expected lifetime is just a little more than the factory warranty. There is no incentive for the company to spend more money to make the product last longer than it is responsible for. In fact, if they spend more time/money on making the product last longer, the profit margin decreases, people buy less new cars, and the CEOs and upper management will get a few million dollar less in bonuses.

      This is the same company that got fined BILLIONS and BILLIONS for cheating with diesel engines just because they wanted to save a little money (i.e. make more money) on each car.
      Last edited by findalex; 07-03-2019 at 09:20 PM.

    7. Semi-n00b
      Join Date
      Apr 2nd, 2019
      Posts
      18
      07-18-2019 01:29 AM #5
      Quote Originally Posted by findalex View Post
      The thing could have just oveheated and stopped working to prevent further damage. Once cooled down, it'll work again. Overheating is caused by clogged heat exchanger, too little/too much fluid, old fluid, or failed internal oil pump. There are circuit boards and solenoids inside the mechatronics. Many mechatronics failed because of the solenoids, and the circuit boards were updated in later versions.

      The expected lifetime is just a little more than the factory warranty. There is no incentive for the company to spend more money to make the product last longer than it is responsible for. In fact, if they spend more time/money on making the product last longer, the profit margin decreases, people buy less new cars, and the CEOs and upper management will get a few million dollar less in bonuses.

      This is the same company that got fined BILLIONS and BILLIONS for cheating with diesel engines just because they wanted to save a little money (i.e. make more money) on each car.
      Make sense. And now they stopped the production of the 1.4 twincharge replaced it to 1.4 turbo only on the latest vehicle also to reduce the production cost also?

      By the way, related to my friend case above, it's been several weeks now, and the car still run properly, however, he have a car diagnostic OBD tools (not Ross tech sorry) and shown as below in the fault codes. He clear it. And up until now the car still running well. Maybe my friend just lucky? Or have a potential more damage in the future?

      It's not a volkswagen, it's just a car

    8. Member
      Join Date
      Aug 15th, 2018
      Location
      Los Angeles, CA, USA
      Posts
      215
      07-18-2019 06:03 PM #6
      Normally when I see so many random codes, I start to suspect the electrical system.

      I'd start with checking the battery and alternator. Make sure to load test the battery and alternator. Most auto parts places check them for free here in the U.S., so your country might be the same. When things get too hot, batteries/alternator get weird. Borderline bad electrical connections are also affected. You said you're in a tropical country, so also check for rusted ground/electrical connections. Iron rust is brown, copper rust is green. Use WD-40 (water displacement formula 40), clean, and then dielectric grease on connections if they look suspicious.

      Also, the DSG's have more issues with overheating especially in the earlier models (2009 and older). I don't know if the pump isn't strong enough or the electronics aren't robust enough. My 2009 A3 with DSG definitely drove a lot worse when the transmission is really hot, compared with my 2013 A3 DSG.

      You can 1) change the DSG fluids often as they are responsible for heat reduction, and 2) make sure your radiator is clean and not blocked, 3) flush and replace the coolant if you haven't in the last 5 - 6 years (use only distilled water and G13 backwards compatible with G12), and 4) remove the DSG oil cooler and check for blockage.
      Last edited by findalex; 07-18-2019 at 06:06 PM.

    9. Semi-n00b
      Join Date
      Apr 2nd, 2019
      Posts
      18
      07-19-2019 09:35 AM #7
      Quote Originally Posted by findalex View Post
      Normally when I see so many random codes, I start to suspect the electrical system.

      I'd start with checking the battery and alternator. Make sure to load test the battery and alternator. Most auto parts places check them for free here in the U.S., so your country might be the same. When things get too hot, batteries/alternator get weird. Borderline bad electrical connections are also affected. You said you're in a tropical country, so also check for rusted ground/electrical connections. Iron rust is brown, copper rust is green. Use WD-40 (water displacement formula 40), clean, and then dielectric grease on connections if they look suspicious.

      Also, the DSG's have more issues with overheating especially in the earlier models (2009 and older). I don't know if the pump isn't strong enough or the electronics aren't robust enough. My 2009 A3 with DSG definitely drove a lot worse when the transmission is really hot, compared with my 2013 A3 DSG.

      You can 1) change the DSG fluids often as they are responsible for heat reduction, and 2) make sure your radiator is clean and not blocked, 3) flush and replace the coolant if you haven't in the last 5 - 6 years (use only distilled water and G13 backwards compatible with G12), and 4) remove the DSG oil cooler and check for blockage.
      I ask my friends related to DSG fluid you mention.
      My friends said there are two kind of oil :
      1. The one is the oil that submerged the gear which is arround 1.7 litre for DQ200.
      2. Another one is fill on the mecha (brain of DSG) ? (I don't know how many ltr it is)

      Is that right? Which one is you referring to change it as often as I can? Number one or two?

      It's not a volkswagen, it's just a car

    10. Member
      Join Date
      Aug 15th, 2018
      Location
      Los Angeles, CA, USA
      Posts
      215
      07-22-2019 02:34 AM #8
      I would change both oil, but if I had to choose, I would change the oil for the mechatronics. The mechatronics has electronic components (PCB, solenoids, connectors) that are more sensitive to temperature changes.

      The other oil is just regular gear oil. The gears are pretty strong and aren't affected by heat and containmination as much.

      A DSG is basically a manual transmission that is shifted by a mechatronics brain using solenoids/fluids.

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