Fourtitude.com - Ace of Base: The Cayman Chase
Username or Email Address
Do you already have an account?
Forgot your password?
  • Log in or Sign up

    Fourtitude.com


    Page 6 of 7 FirstFirst ... 234567 LastLast
    Results 126 to 150 of 152
    1. Geriatric Member spockcat's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 4th, 2003
      Location
      West Coast, not that west coast. Bay area, not that bay area.
      Posts
      40,354
      Cars
      16 Cayman GTS, 16 Colorado Crew, 17 Escape, 09 Versys, 2017 Barracuda
      03-13-2019 06:05 PM #126
      Quote Originally Posted by Fined View Post
      You did what? You needed a $20 keyshell off amazon.

      https://www.amazon.com/Keyless-Porsc.../dp/B0727S8YPT

      The broken button is extremely common for 987/997 cars. I've had broken ones on both the 997.2 and the 987.2. Even a brand new keyshell from Porsche directly doesn't hold up, I got a new unused key with the 911 when I bought it (they were short one and I asked them to provide 2 with the car so they made a new one) and it didn't hold up either. The amazon key shells I've bought are the same quality and tactility as the OE based on comparing them.

      I ended up doing a DIY mod on a new key shell last year after being tired of having a broken button every 7 months or so. I got the new key shell with its parts and reinforced a tiny tab on the plastic underside of the buttons. I epoxied a sliver of aluminum from a soda can to the little part of the plastic tab that breaks. It's held for a year now, so time will tell. I think it's going to last though.
      Now you tell him.

    2. Remove Advertisements

      Advertisements
       

    3. Member kiznarsh's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 10th, 2007
      Location
      SoCal
      Posts
      3,300
      Cars
      E39 M5 | 987.2
      03-13-2019 06:56 PM #127
      Quote Originally Posted by Fined View Post
      You did what? You needed a $20 keyshell off amazon.
      I really wanted a new OEM key though (I'm anal about certain things) as it makes it feel like a new car in some respects. Any future damages to the buttons and I'll get spare parts from Amazon, but in this instance I'm OK with it.

      I did a good amount of research to figure out the best option but didn't think to look on Amazon. Key #2 is also pretty worn so it's nice having a fresh OEM key.

      Thanks for the tip.

    4. Member titleist1976's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 25th, 2002
      Posts
      11,628
      Cars
      Honda Pilot, C4S
      03-15-2019 01:35 PM #128
      Quote Originally Posted by kiznarsh View Post
      I used this fancy Snap-On trim tool that has nice rounded edges...it was left behind by the indy shop after working on the MR2 back in the day. I can post a pic when I get home. But any flat head will work.
      Thanks. I tried a razor blade and couldn't get up underneath the lip.

    5. Member kiznarsh's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 10th, 2007
      Location
      SoCal
      Posts
      3,300
      Cars
      E39 M5 | 987.2
      03-28-2019 01:28 AM #129
      Sure you gotta take the wheels off, but once you get access, plug extraction should be a piece of cake they said. Sorta.

      Excited to use my new 1/2" impact.



      New plugs (same part no. as the ones I removed).



      Removed the fender liners and getting to the heat shield.



      We're in.



      Used a couple of long flatheads to remove the coil pack connectors.





      I see you.



      One of the oxygen sensors was in the way so removed it for easier access. Used the special wrench for it based on habit, but there's plenty of room to use a standard 22mm wrench.



      First plug removed; looked pretty good. I have no documentation if they've ever replaced though and they're scheduled for every 40k miles.





      I've heard of people using universal joints to get access to cylinders 1 & 4, but removing the lower panel gives you enough room, as illustrated below.



      Torqued to 30 Nm and did not apply any anti-seize per Porsche spec. So the driver side went swimmingly.

      Moved over to the passenger side and removing everything was even faster since it was the 2nd time around. Started with cylinder #3 and that easily came out as well. Nice.

      But for both #2 and #1, I had a horrible time. Needed my 18" breaker bar to crack 'em loose and needed a lot of force to unscrew them. I kept thinking they were cross-threaded but no way to know until they're out. The worst was cylinder #1 where I could only get 1/16th of a turn on my 1/2" ratchet. Not fun but ultimately got both out.

      Cylinder #2:



      Cylinder #1:



      I'm curious why only 2 of them had corrosion, and why both on that side...

    6. Member
      Join Date
      Oct 18th, 2017
      Location
      Saskatchewan
      Posts
      220
      Cars
      2012 Cayman, 2018 Alltrack
      03-28-2019 11:24 AM #130
      Quote Originally Posted by kiznarsh View Post
      I'm curious why only 2 of them had corrosion, and why both on that side...
      Probably just a little bit of bore scoring. Either that or a failed IMS or leaking blinker fluid has contaminated your engine.

      Thanks for this thread, my plugs need to be changed as well and it helps give me the confidence to do it myself. I've done plugs on easy to access I4's before, but this is a bit more involved.

    7. Don't be me. Don't be a 'Rick' Cabin Pics's Avatar
      Join Date
      Mar 19th, 2008
      Location
      In The Woods
      Posts
      9,660
      Cars
      2004 E46, 2018 SQ5
      03-28-2019 12:18 PM #131
      Why do you punish yourself in such cruel ways Kiz?
      Instagram - efrie004

    8. Member kiznarsh's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 10th, 2007
      Location
      SoCal
      Posts
      3,300
      Cars
      E39 M5 | 987.2
      03-28-2019 01:17 PM #132
      Quote Originally Posted by Cabin Pics View Post
      Why do you punish yourself in such cruel ways Kiz?
      You mean like working in the dark?


    9. Chili Bigot Seabird's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 8th, 2002
      Location
      Secret underground lair with machine gun turrets
      Posts
      18,982
      Cars
      392+485=LOL
      03-28-2019 01:42 PM #133
      Quote Originally Posted by KrisA View Post
      Either that or a failed IMS
      That was mean.
      Quote Originally Posted by Col. David Crockett
      I told the people of my district, that, if they saw fit to re-elect me, I would serve them as faithfully as I had done; but, if not, they might go to Hell, and I would go to Texas.

    10. Member
      Join Date
      Feb 1st, 2012
      Location
      MI
      Posts
      4,608
      Cars
      2005 Acura TSX
      03-28-2019 02:07 PM #134
      I will remember this thread about changing Cayman spark plugs when I think it's hard to change the back bank plugs on a FWD V6 car.

    11. Member kiznarsh's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 10th, 2007
      Location
      SoCal
      Posts
      3,300
      Cars
      E39 M5 | 987.2
      04-15-2019 01:31 AM #135
      Tackled the last major item on my short-term to-do list with a new water pump, thermostat, and associated coolant flush. Dealer quote for this job: $1,890.

      Wanted ample space for this job so parked the M5 outside. This also accelerated the purchase of my new 20-gallon air compressor.



      Engine covers removed and belt removed from the WP pulley.





      Supplies.





      Getting the car high up on jack stands didn't go smoothly. Raising the rear end is easier but the front end needed some finagling. The side handles on the jack were in the way and I couldn't get the jack stand under the factory lifting location.



      OK so just remove the handles, right? Started doing that but then realized I don't have access to the other set of bolts unless I disassemble the jack. Eff that noise.



      So decided to go in from the front but the 2x8 under the front wheel that I normally use wasn't enough, so needed to add another piece of wood.



      Alright, now we can begin.



      To ensure the coolant drains from the heater core, put the temp on high and fan on low.



      Coolant drain plug in the thermostat housing.



      And we're flowing from the block.



      Good news: coolant level sensor works.



      Loosened the supply & return hoses for the radiators.



      Need to loosen the clamps on the heater hoses for more drainage.



      Piece of cake with the right tool.







      All told, I got a little over 4 gallons to drain out. Was hoping for more but didn't feel like trying to raise the front of the car without a center lifting point.

      Now to remove the 5, E10 and 1, E12 torx bolt. I only had sockets which was a problem, so day 1 ended here. Ordered a ratcheting wrench on Amazon and started again the next day, so that's where we pick up this adventure.

      Now we're cooking with fire.



      Removed the E12 bolt with relatively plenty of room.



      And it's out. Bearing actually felt OK, though compared to the new unit, there was just the slightest bit of play. Probably would've been fine for a while but no regrets on doing this now.





      Now for the thermostat. Same E10 torx bolts, except the top one has such little clearance that my ratcheting wrench wouldn't fit. And so another purchase for a box-end E10/E12 wrench, plus the proper lubricant for the O-rings.





      Thermostat coming out.





      Alright, so you see that Dichtring in the lower left? Yeah...you could probably leave that in as its removal is a royal PITA.



      I was being overzealous with my "change all rubber parts while you're in there" motto but pretty sure this wasn't meant to be a serviceable part. Tried picking it at, grabbing it with pliers, and I just couldn't get it to budge. I then decided I should just leave it, except by this point it was already too damaged.



      So went over to my buddy's place who's got way more tools than me, and ended up using this monstrosity to pull it out while using a vise to hold it. It's a slide hammer that he bought from Harbor Freight a long, long time ago.





      Then to install the new one, we had to press it in while making sure it didn't get stuck as the clearance is really tight. So yeah, don't do this.



      With that taken care of, back to my place and swapping out the housing seal.

      Old:



      New:



      Applied lubricant and replaced the t-stat O-ring too.



      Cleaned up the mating surface with a razor blade and polishing pad (also did this for the WP connection).





      Reinstalled the t-stat housing. Not wanting to spring for the $900 special torque wrench, here's what I did: I tightened the bolt where my torque wrench could access until it was snug, then marked it.



      Then torqued to 13 Nm and observed I needed about another ~1/16 of a turn, so that's what I tried to duplicate for the other bolts with tight access.



      Getting ready to install the WP.



      Plenty of room guys.





      The aluminum crush washer for the t-stat housing had contracted to the point where I needed to cut it for removal. Couldn't find torque specs for it so went with 25 Nm, same as the oil drain plug.



      Replaced the caps for the filler neck and expansion tank for good measure.





      Bought the Schwaben purge/refill tool for drawing a vacuum on the system.



      This was the original setup but I could never get a tight seal on the filler neck.



      Ended up having to use the expansion tank instead which worked easily. Was able to pull -26 in-Hg and hold it steady for 2 minutes. No leaks!





      Then opened up the suction valve and starting filling it up.





      All buttoned up and we're set.

      Last edited by kiznarsh; 04-15-2019 at 02:24 PM.

    12. Member kiznarsh's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 10th, 2007
      Location
      SoCal
      Posts
      3,300
      Cars
      E39 M5 | 987.2
      04-15-2019 02:03 AM #136
      Few more things. Remember when I thought the windshield washer fluid leak was due to overfilling it? Well, not exactly. Ended up with another puddle again and this time spent more time figuring it out.

      Removed the wheel and fender liner, then pulled the reservoir out.



      Thought it could be leaking from the grommet, but that didn't make sense since that should cause it to leak anytime there was fluid in there.



      Read up about it and realized sometimes the actual pump itself develops a leak. Sho' 'nuff, that's what it was. Sprayed soapy water on it, hooked up a tube and blew bubbles. No bueno.



      Ordered the same exact pump for $18. The identical "Porsche" pump? $148! Used a light coat of RTV to seal the new grommet to the reservoir.



      Also cleaned up the wiring with new loom tape before putting the liner and wheel back on.



      Got tired of guessing how much to add, although now I'm wondering why I bothered to label it with such high fidelity. Capacity is 2.5L, though I'm not sure exactly when the sensor sends the signal to refill. Maybe 0.5 liter left? Either way, I can't stand the constant reminder so I try to fill it up ASAP. Probably go with just adding 2 liters.



      Then noticed some brake fluid chilling in the edge of the reservoir. Removed the panel to investigate further.





      Seems like a little just spilled the last time it was filled, so cleaned it up and that's that.



      The latch for the frunk wasn't operating smoothly, so cleaned and lubricated it for a more pleasing experience.





      Car came with one of those integrated backup camera/license plate frames, but they used non-stainless steel hardware and that just doesn't work for me.



      Curious how they did the wiring. No longer curious.



      Picked up a couple shiny 1/4-20s and even though it doesn't blend with the black, it still looks better IMO.



      So that's sorted.



      Swapped the 981 bolt with the 987 one for my tow hook mount and got that aligned.



      Used threadlocker for more security.



      Lastly replaced the trunk gas struts and the wiper blades.



      Needed to roll out of the garage to get the trunk all the way open to swap the struts.



      Alrighty then.

    13. You can't look at my avatar for just a second, can you? Just another GTI's Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 11th, 2002
      Location
      Southwest Ohio
      Posts
      4,052
      Cars
      GTI Sport 6M
      04-15-2019 02:51 AM #137


      I learned something new from your last post. I'd never even heard of external torx bolts (e bolts).

      I don't recall ever seeing them on any of my VWs.

    14. Member rammalammadingdong's Avatar
      Join Date
      Mar 2nd, 2007
      Location
      Norf
      Posts
      1,357
      Cars
      One SUV, One CUV
      04-15-2019 08:53 AM #138
      that was awesome!
      I also had no clue about external torx bolts.

      So, what did your DIY total come to including the tool purchases needed to get everything done, compared to the dealer quote?

      Far more rewarding doing it yourself, especially if money savings was significant.
      Your OEM Porsche parts/fluids - did you get any discounts on those?

      Thanks again

    15. Member
      Join Date
      Oct 7th, 2006
      Location
      CT
      Posts
      2,116
      Cars
      Evo VIII, BMW e12, XTerra
      04-15-2019 10:25 AM #139
      Really admire your attention to detail.

    16. Member KingUnderpants's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 8th, 2004
      Location
      Ontario, Canada
      Posts
      2,341
      Cars
      1996 Porsche 911, 2006 Acura CSX
      04-15-2019 10:30 AM #140
      Great stuff!

    17. Member Meroving1an's Avatar
      Join Date
      Mar 19th, 2007
      Location
      San Francisco, CA
      Posts
      892
      Cars
      Present: 991.1 GT3 Past: ND MX-5, GVB STI
      04-15-2019 12:04 PM #141
      Fantastic read! Thanks for taking the effort to document it for our information.

    18. Member kiznarsh's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 10th, 2007
      Location
      SoCal
      Posts
      3,300
      Cars
      E39 M5 | 987.2
      04-15-2019 12:08 PM #142
      Quote Originally Posted by rammalammadingdong View Post
      that was awesome!
      I also had no clue about external torx bolts.

      So, what did your DIY total come to including the tool purchases needed to get everything done, compared to the dealer quote?

      Far more rewarding doing it yourself, especially if money savings was significant.
      Your OEM Porsche parts/fluids - did you get any discounts on those?

      Thanks again
      Thanks! No discounts on any of the parts but I always do my due diligence to get a good deal. The coolant was $40/gallon and there's plenty of debate whether it's the same as other, less expensive options but sometimes I feel more comfortable getting the OEM product. I know I ridicule some of the other Porsche mark-ups so maybe that's hypocritical, but once again it comes down to being comfortable for doing the work; obviously coolant flushes aren't something I want to do any more than necessary.

      Water pump & t-stat = $473
      Coolant = $120
      Air purge/refill tool = $78 (excluding the air compressor since I was always going to buy one anyway for other tasks)
      Cooling system lubricant = $26
      O-rings/seals = $45
      E-Torx wrenches = $50

      Total = $792

      So basically saved around $1,100.


    19. Member
      Join Date
      Nov 19th, 2006
      Location
      Arden, NC
      Posts
      3,660
      Cars
      2009 BMW 328it
      04-15-2019 01:11 PM #143
      Quote Originally Posted by rammalammadingdong View Post
      I also had no clue about external torx bolts.
      There's a bunch of them on my car, and the first time I saw them I was a bit pissed, but the cool thing about them is that they're nearly unstrippable and the wrench stays on them really well, even at weird angles. The annoying thing was having to buy new wrenches for them.

    20. Planters (fasciitis) peanuts. Dang dogg Sold Over Sticker's Avatar
      Join Date
      Nov 28th, 2009
      Posts
      15,840
      04-15-2019 02:23 PM #144
      God bless you for having the patience that I don't. I'd be all swear words and bloody knuckles in those tight spaces.
      Driving While Awesome Podcast. Give it a listen.
      Quote Originally Posted by Phillie Phanatic
      SoS - please shoot a message when Brendan & His Retarded Sycophants has another gig. I’ll be there, front row.

    21. Member TheDeckMan's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 26th, 2004
      Location
      W.Mass
      Posts
      18,475
      Cars
      GMC, SAABs,VW's, MG
      04-15-2019 04:55 PM #145
      Well done!
      -Noah
      Corrado| 996 Turbo |997 Turbo |TT|
      "Life is tough, but it's tougher if you're stupid" - John Wayne

    22. Senior Member UncleJB's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jul 2nd, 2002
      Location
      NH Lakes Region
      Posts
      21,024
      Cars
      15 GSW, 15 Passat Sport, 03 20th, 88 Cabby, 64 Yamaha
      04-15-2019 05:21 PM #146
      Quote Originally Posted by Sold Over Sticker View Post
      God bless you for having the patience that I don't. I'd be all swear words and bloody knuckles in those tight spaces.
      So much this. I have a lot of respect for you guys that will just dig right in and get this stuff done.

    23. Don't be me. Don't be a 'Rick' Cabin Pics's Avatar
      Join Date
      Mar 19th, 2008
      Location
      In The Woods
      Posts
      9,660
      Cars
      2004 E46, 2018 SQ5
      04-15-2019 05:39 PM #147
      Quote Originally Posted by Sold Over Sticker View Post
      God bless you for having the patience that I don't. I'd be all swear words and bloody knuckles in those tight spaces.
      Same. I'll tackle a lot, but there's no way I'd mess with the stuff you are on this car.

      Nope.
      Instagram - efrie004

    24. Member kiznarsh's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 10th, 2007
      Location
      SoCal
      Posts
      3,300
      Cars
      E39 M5 | 987.2
      04-15-2019 07:44 PM #148
      Quote Originally Posted by UncleJB View Post
      So much this. I have a lot of respect for you guys that will just dig right in and get this stuff done.
      Quote Originally Posted by Cabin Pics View Post
      Same. I'll tackle a lot, but there's no way I'd mess with the stuff you are on this car.

      Nope.
      To be fair, it looks worse since it's my first time doing this. But I also have no desire to do any of it again, unless I keep the car long enough to do another 60k miles.

    25. Member CoreyB's Avatar
      Join Date
      Nov 26th, 2009
      Location
      Wethersfield, CT
      Posts
      1,918
      Cars
      monty green money pit, 01 nogaro blue Audi S4
      04-15-2019 08:39 PM #149
      I'll let you guys all in on a little secret with e-torx bolts, regular metric wrenches work on them with no issue. I have the proper tools, but I've used an 8mm wrench on E10's many times and never had an issue. If it's in a tight space and a socket doesn't fit then I usually just put a wrench on it.

      Also, I believe the Kluberplus gel(00004320593) is supposed to be diluted 50/50 with water before it is used to lubricate o-rings. It is only referenced in a few documents that Porsche has published, but I would find it odd that they only want it diluted some of the time. I have used it both mixed and straight and find it works better when it has been diluted.

      Only other thing, the oil drain plug torque is 50Nm not 25, the oil filter housing is 25 though, not sure if that is what you are confused with or maybe you have an aftermarket drain plug that is steel and uses a lower torque. If that's the case than just ignore my comment.

      Anyways, some awesome DIY work going on here. Keep it up Definitely cool to see someone tackling this stuff at home. If you are ever unsure of torque specs or repair procedures for this just shoot me a message, I'm more than happy to share!
      Have a Porsche related question, or need specific info about a Porsche model? Please feel free to ask. I am a certified Porsche tech

    26. Member kiznarsh's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 10th, 2007
      Location
      SoCal
      Posts
      3,300
      Cars
      E39 M5 | 987.2
      04-15-2019 10:22 PM #150
      Quote Originally Posted by CoreyB View Post
      I'll let you guys all in on a little secret with e-torx bolts, regular metric wrenches work on them with no issue. I have the proper tools, but I've used an 8mm wrench on E10's many times and never had an issue. If it's in a tight space and a socket doesn't fit then I usually just put a wrench on it.

      Also, I believe the Kluberplus gel(00004320593) is supposed to be diluted 50/50 with water before it is used to lubricate o-rings. It is only referenced in a few documents that Porsche has published, but I would find it odd that they only want it diluted some of the time. I have used it both mixed and straight and find it works better when it has been diluted.

      Only other thing, the oil drain plug torque is 50Nm not 25, the oil filter housing is 25 though, not sure if that is what you are confused with or maybe you have an aftermarket drain plug that is steel and uses a lower torque. If that's the case than just ignore my comment.

      Anyways, some awesome DIY work going on here. Keep it up Definitely cool to see someone tackling this stuff at home. If you are ever unsure of torque specs or repair procedures for this just shoot me a message, I'm more than happy to share!
      Thanks for chiming in, appreciate the input! Feel free to set me straight whenever you see fit.

      I've been following instructions from All Data with this car, plus supplementing it with previous work that people have done, though that's not always wise as some people cut major corners.

      That gel was rather viscous and by the time I had the O-rings coated, it felt pretty good but I can see how diluting it could help. Hopefully they don't dry up on me, though I bet that would still take a long time.

      What are your thoughts on only getting a little over 4 gallons out? I'm sure some was left in the block and pooled in the bottom of the radiators and heater core. What's the standard process to maximize coolant drainage?

      And yes, I had the oil filter housing in mind, not the actual drain plug. Is 25 Nm correct for the thermostat housing?

    Page 6 of 7 FirstFirst ... 234567 LastLast

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •