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    1. 02-05-2018 09:25 AM #26
      Quote Originally Posted by atomicalex View Post
      Please continue...
      ...not much I can say really.

      Of course mine wasn't glowing like the whole system in that picture, but the manifold would indeed be glowing a hot reddish orange after I had been on sustained boost --- I lived like 3 minutes off the highway exit so it was the case that I had been blasting down the freeway at max and had generated some serious heat. After such a drive I would often make a habit of popping the hood for a quick inspect while the car idled before shutdown because I was paranoid about coking the turbo.

      I don't have any hard data or anything but I can say that I noticed a considerable difference in radiant heat after the Jet-Hot coating.

      I ran it like that for nearly a decade and it lasted very well with only some minor flaking in a couple of spots.

      Took it off only because I switched to headers.

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    3. Member GLI Dan's Avatar
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      02-05-2018 09:59 AM #27
      In my opinion they're a game changer. Not sure if some of the rates these detailers are charging make all that much sense, but it is not, not worth it.

      On a newer car, a one step correction with the associated steps with a ceramic sealer is unbeatable. As said, everything just washes away with a good hose and the level of gloss/sheen the paint retains is unparalleled by any wax. It's definitely a worth while investment for a new car.

      When I purchased my e92 I had it quoted w/ a step and it was about $700 iirc. I opted for a lesser product that only offered about 6months and cost $350. I slightly regret not opting for the long term protection because once you have experienced the quality of the ceramic coatings, wax is just a let down.

      As far as applying it yourself, I have no idea. Most of the detailers around me advertise that they are in some way "certified" to use a product. I'm sure this certification isn't difficult to obtain, but it does create a bar for entry and highlights the fact that it isn't quite as simple as "wax on, wax off."
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    4. Member candy11's Avatar
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      02-05-2018 07:39 PM #28
      Quote Originally Posted by SourKrout View Post
      Jeff at Luxor over by Costco. He seems to do quality work but if you need your car back at a specific time be sure to stress that upfront.
      Thanks! I have thought about using Luxor, but never heard anything about his quality of work.

    5. Member Triumph's Avatar
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      02-05-2018 08:26 PM #29
      $2,000-3,000 buys you a lot of top level detailing of a car over the years that you'll own it. Putting $2,500 worth of paint protection on a $25,000 car is just...
      -Triumph, the Insult Comic Dog

      I saw this in a movie about a bus that had to speed around the city, keeping its speed over fifty, and if its speed dropped, the bus would explode! I think it was called, "The Bus That Couldn't Slow Down."

    6. Member freedomgli's Avatar
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      02-05-2018 08:35 PM #30
      Quote Originally Posted by Triumph View Post
      $2,000-3,000 buys you a lot of top level detailing of a car over the years that you'll own it. Putting $2,500 worth of paint protection on a $25,000 car is just...
      On the flip side, around me top notch detailers charge about $400 per job for a hand wash, clay bar, paint correction, and product treatment (sealant, wax, dressing, etc.) so even if you only did that once every 6-9 months you’d be at $2k in no time. These detailers need to make up for the fact that they won’t have as much recurring business because the ceramic coatings last so long.

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      02-05-2018 09:47 PM #31
      Quote Originally Posted by atomicalex View Post
      I thought we would discuss actual ceramic coatings. Like for pistons and exhausts and stuff.
      Same


      Run ceramic coated stock pistons in my A3 built motor/GTX3071R setup since no one seems to actually do a piston with the stock direct injection dish anymore unless you pay for custom ones.. despite several companies formerly making them....


      Also agreed these aren't really ceramic and I don't really get their alleged superiority over a sealer (especially for the price) when they need to be refreshed annually according to some posts.

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      02-05-2018 09:49 PM #32
      Quote Originally Posted by freedomgli View Post
      On the flip side, around me top notch detailers charge about $400 per job for a hand wash, clay bar, paint correction, and product treatment (sealant, wax, dressing, etc.) so even if you only did that once every 6-9 months you’d be at $2k in no time. These detailers need to make up for the fact that they won’t have as much recurring business because the ceramic coatings last so long.
      IF you did that every 6-9 months you'd be at a lot more than 2k in no time since that frequent of actual paint correction would require you to get the car painted in order to protect all the metal you exposed...

    9. Member freedomgli's Avatar
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      02-05-2018 10:02 PM #33
      Quote Originally Posted by chris86vw View Post
      IF you did that every 6-9 months you'd be at a lot more than 2k in no time since that frequent of actual paint correction would require you to get the car painted in order to protect all the metal you exposed...
      True that. Paint is only so thick and all buffing must be done carefully to remove the minimum material. For me the cost of hydrophobic ceramic paint coatings is worth it to have a car that looks clean all the time with minimal effort on my part. I used to spend all day detailing my car. Those days are long gone.

    10. Junior Member Camviet's Avatar
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      02-05-2018 10:41 PM #34
      Quote Originally Posted by ImpeccableNEW View Post
      Id prolly ask this guy
      That's Matt Moreman's S2000 CR, has CQuartz UK and TiO2 on it. Matt's a pretty insane guy when it comes to car detailing and finish. He liked Collinite 845 and Jescar Powerlock, used them for years on various vehicles. Recently he delved into other coatings such as CQuartz, CarPro, AMMO and Kamikaze. There's videos of him using and talking about the products. He's a straight shooter and will tell it how it is. Here's his video about the AMMO system:
      https://youtu.be/xC2mt93cjLo?t=46m56s

      I also use the AMMO system, and although it is not a full on glass or ceramic coating, it has a ton of durability and great look. I've had it on my Tiguan for about 9 months, very minor marring and very few waterspotting, but with regular care and maintenance it definitely is a good choice. As with any coating, proper care and maintenance is key in keeping a vehicle clean and protected. It's the proper maintenance regiment for that specific product that may persuade you otherwise in choosing a product. AMMO has a layering system where you add on layers of protection over time. Larry (owner/creator of AMMO) suggests a base Reflex coat twice a year, Skin quarterly, and a carnauba wax monthly. I've followed this regime with a synthetic wax in place of his Creme, and using a proper drying aid makes washes a quick thirty minute process, with maintenance (Skin) adding an additional 30-45 minutes once every month.


      A product I've been turned to is Kamikaze. They have two coatings, both offering different look and durability. ISM is a longer lasting product as compared to Myabi, but both offer great depth and shine. One thing that Matt has brought to my attention is how some coatings give off an artificial shine, a deep wet look that makes the paint appear different. He's better at explaining the difference, but in his words, it "just looks right" (comparing a car covered with a wax versus a coating). AMMO looks like a standard wax with the additional protection. The same can be said with Kamikaze, as showcased by Todd Cooperider of Esoteric Auto Detail.


      In comparison to CQuartz or CarPro, Kamikaze looks the easiest to apply and maintenance includes normal washing with Overcoat application once every few washes (superficial protection layer). Most ceramic/glass coatings offer some sort of superficial coating to preserve the actual ceramic/glass coating.

      To answer OP's question about coatings replacing the dreg of waxing; no. It makes it easier to maintain, you don't have to re-apply it every few weeks, but you still have to maintain and wash it. If the car gets contaminated and needs a claying, it will need claying regardless of what product is on the paint. Some products may be more resistant to contamination, they may be harder, but if you improperly wash and care for the product, the longevity of the product's properties won't last the advertised time. If the paint comes up with waterspotting, you'll need to either use a specific water-spot removing product, or compound the paint. With coatings, it will become heavy compounding since the surface is now harder.
      Essentially, I went from waxing the car every other week to sealing the car every three months, and will transition to using a coating maintenance product once a month. With coatings you won't really have a need to wax anymore. Another thing to keep in mind, you can't always layer multiple products on top of each other if they aren't made to do so. AMMO and most coatings have specific products for layering. You can't put three or four different waxes and think that having more layers of wax will last longer/protect better.

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      02-06-2018 12:23 AM #35
      Quote Originally Posted by Triumph View Post
      $2,000-3,000 buys you a lot of top level detailing of a car over the years that you'll own it. Putting $2,500 worth of paint protection on a $25,000 car is just...
      OP was asking about doing it himself, which wouldn't cost nearly as much.

    12. 02-06-2018 08:05 AM #36
      To me, I saw the thread title and got excited thinking it was ceramic coating pistons or headers or other parts.

      Oh well.........
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    13. 02-06-2018 11:09 AM #37
      This thread is of definite interest to me. The SS puts me back on the flip side of my flip-flop relationship with black cars. Picked the car up in November and it had already been subjected to numerous dealership washes. And with this winter being particularly brutal, it hasn't received anything more than touch free automatic washes when the temp creeps into the 20's.

      I'm far from a detailing expert, but I'm hoping to get the car in respectable shape come spring. I have no ambitions of show quality appearances all the time, but if there's something I can do to make the car easier to keep cleaner and shinier than average for longer, then I'm game. I love a clean car, but I just don't have the time to dedicate all of my precious weekend time to it.



      Everyone lamenting the thread topic - not sure why you're not creating a thread instead of just echoing one another? It would probably be quite interesting.

      Quote Originally Posted by atomicalex View Post
      I thought we would discuss actual ceramic coatings. Like for pistons and exhausts and stuff.
      Quote Originally Posted by stiggy-pug View Post
      That's what I thought too.
      Quote Originally Posted by chris86vw View Post
      Same
      Quote Originally Posted by burnthesheep View Post
      To me, I saw the thread title and got excited thinking it was ceramic coating pistons or headers or other parts.

      Oh well.........
      2017 Chevy SS | 1977 Trans Am
      ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯

    14. 02-06-2018 01:04 PM #38
      So if you have one of these coatings, should you NOT do anything more than the most basic wash in the touchless carwash in the winter?

      My winter regimen is typically to drive to a coin car wash, blast a$$ on the salt to get the majority of it off, then drive straight to a good touchless carwash and get the best wash to get some more off and mainly to get the car blow dried.

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      02-06-2018 02:01 PM #39
      Quote Originally Posted by puma1552 View Post
      So if you have one of these coatings, should you NOT do anything more than the most basic wash in the touchless carwash in the winter?

      My winter regimen is typically to drive to a coin car wash, blast a$$ on the salt to get the majority of it off, then drive straight to a good touchless carwash and get the best wash to get some more off and mainly to get the car blow dried.
      If you have one, you CAN do more, but the extra stuff the touchless gives you is nearly pointless. You could get 95% of everything off with the coin-op and just using pressurized water.
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      02-06-2018 02:10 PM #40
      Quote Originally Posted by iliveoncaffiene View Post
      If you have one, you CAN do more, but the extra stuff the touchless gives you is nearly pointless. You could get 95% of everything off with the coin-op and just using pressurized water.
      Ditto, and the same results come with using just the touch-less. The biggest difference I noticed is how grime doesn't stick to the glass where the wipers can't reach like it did before treatment. I believe my detailer applied Ceramic Pro Rain which after 6 months is holding up great.

      http://ceramic-pro.com/en/shop/produ.../product/rain/

    17. Member Smigelski's Avatar
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      02-06-2018 02:18 PM #41
      I'm gonna come right out and ask for recommendations for products to DIY in my garage. Come Spring I'm going to strip the sealant off the Golf, clar bar it, and start fresh. I wouldn't mind trying a ceramic coating.

      I know that professionally install coatings last longer, but as it is, my car's regular sealants last forever (garage kept, doesn't see a ton of rain). Also, I like doing this stuff myself.

      Also, how well do these coatings work for single stage paint? My Miata has no clear coat, so I'd want to make sure it's safe before trying it on that car.

    18. Junior Member nc_detail_garage's Avatar
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      02-07-2018 08:27 AM #42
      Quote Originally Posted by Smigelski View Post
      I'm gonna come right out and ask for recommendations for products to DIY in my garage. Come Spring I'm going to strip the sealant off the Golf, clar bar it, and start fresh. I wouldn't mind trying a ceramic coating.

      I know that professionally install coatings last longer, but as it is, my car's regular sealants last forever (garage kept, doesn't see a ton of rain). Also, I like doing this stuff myself.

      Also, how well do these coatings work for single stage paint? My Miata has no clear coat, so I'd want to make sure it's safe before trying it on that car.
      My recommendation would be anything from the Gyeon Quartz line. (One / Pure / Synchro) Their products are very user friendly, flash quickly, and are much easier to remove than CQuartz UK. It's worth reading up on the full prep process, including chemical decontamination and ideally a paint correction. No concerns with single stage paint, same install process. Keep in mind that the bulk of the work is in the prep as the coating process, especially the single layer coatings, can be done in under two hours.

      https://www.detailedimage.com/Gyeon-M91/

      If you have any questions, feel free to ping me

    19. 04-02-2018 09:40 PM #43
      Finally got off my a$$ to read into options more a bit tonight.

      Right now I'm kind of eyeing the following:

      -McKees 37
      -22PLE
      -Gyeon Mohs

      All of these seem like good entry level coatings that are easy to apply and should get me a year or so.

      Any thoughts/recommendations on those options?

      I just can't stomach the thought of the futility of glazing/sealing/waxing 3 cars 2-3x a year anymore and seeing the stuff evaporate before my eyes in a matter of weeks or a few heavy storms, even good acrylic sealants at $40/bottle. My cars have never deteriorated with that regimen, and even the crappiest ceramic coating seems like it will be way better than that, so I'm basically already sold on trying a coating, just not sure which one yet but leaning towards the easy to apply ones just to get a feel. A spray on coating sounds like heaven

    20. Junior Member nc_detail_garage's Avatar
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      04-06-2018 08:19 AM #44
      Quote Originally Posted by puma1552 View Post
      Finally got off my a$$ to read into options more a bit tonight.

      Right now I'm kind of eyeing the following:

      -McKees 37
      -22PLE
      -Gyeon Mohs

      All of these seem like good entry level coatings that are easy to apply and should get me a year or so.

      Any thoughts/recommendations on those options?

      I just can't stomach the thought of the futility of glazing/sealing/waxing 3 cars 2-3x a year anymore and seeing the stuff evaporate before my eyes in a matter of weeks or a few heavy storms, even good acrylic sealants at $40/bottle. My cars have never deteriorated with that regimen, and even the crappiest ceramic coating seems like it will be way better than that, so I'm basically already sold on trying a coating, just not sure which one yet but leaning towards the easy to apply ones just to get a feel. A spray on coating sounds like heaven
      I'm biased to Mohs from your list. I have Mohs + Booster on my s4 and continue to use it on client's cars as the results are great and install is easy. I suggest looking into a topper, either from the new Synchro kit or simply Gyeon CanCoat.

      I also suggest watching detailed image for upcoming sales. They're pretty aggressive on their weekly sales.

    21. Member ohiodub_99.5's Avatar
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      05-16-2018 10:22 AM #45
      I may have missed it, but OP, where are you located?
      /| OMGHAI |\

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      05-16-2018 10:51 AM #46
      This thread is definitely relevant for me. I purchased an e90 m3 last year, 2011, with only 15k miles on it. However, the paint is in terrible shape unfortunately - swirl and hologram city, as if a complete noob went after it with a polisher

      I got some quotes for paint correction and ceramic coating, and most (with multi stage correction) are around $2k+

      More than I thought, but considering that the car will likely remain relatively low mileage, and I'll probably sell it in a few years for most of what I paid for it, I think it might be a good investment.

      My latest quote was for Modesta which, from what I can tell, has very good reviews.

      I don't have the time, skills, knowledge, or desire to do it myself at this point in time.

    23. Member Samson's Avatar
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      05-16-2018 11:17 AM #47
      Interesting thread. I'm thinking about doing something like this to our new Rav4. I'd try a DIY job though. I'm not spending professional cash to protect the paint on a Rav4. It does sit outside quite a bit though, and I'd like the paint to last. What's annoying is that it is covered in some sort of rough texture, like it was sprayed with a fine mist of tree sap. It comes off with a clay bar though, so that's good.

      Typically, I just "seal" the cars with either Klasse or Griot's Garage sealant, but it doesn't seem to last all that long. I also suck at some aspect of the process, because I get holograms half of the time. That and the Infiniti dealer swirled the hell out of my G35 when I brought it in for an inspection, even though I asked them to not wash it. I'll be curious to see how the DIY process goes for people without much experience.

    24. 05-16-2018 01:03 PM #48
      I got a random orbiter and some compounds/polishes to fix up the pain on my G last year... I did the heavy cut which helped a ton, but then we had a baby and I never got another weekend to do the final polish + seal

      I got another black car which has paint that isn't as bad but is definitely in need of some attention.... just to recap these are the steps to basic paint restoration, correct?

      - Wash (I've heard to use dish detergent, is this legit?)
      - Clay w/clay bar
      - Compound with least abrasive polish possible + random orbital buffer
      - Seal with synthetic sealant + applicator + microfiber polishing towel in straight strokes along length of car

      Is that about right?

    25. Member steelgatorb8's Avatar
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      05-16-2018 02:08 PM #49
      Quote Originally Posted by CTK View Post
      I got a random orbiter and some compounds/polishes to fix up the pain on my G last year... I did the heavy cut which helped a ton, but then we had a baby and I never got another weekend to do the final polish + seal

      I got another black car which has paint that isn't as bad but is definitely in need of some attention.... just to recap these are the steps to basic paint restoration, correct?

      - Wash (I've heard to use dish detergent, is this legit?)
      - Clay w/clay bar
      - Compound with least abrasive polish possible + random orbital buffer
      - Seal with synthetic sealant + applicator + microfiber polishing towel in straight strokes along length of car

      Is that about right?
      This is coming from someone who has DIY'd his detailing since I've started driving (hard to believe its almost 20 years at this point ) and not a pro detailer at all.

      I've never used dish detergent to "strip" any remaining waxes/sealants off the paint and never looked at the end result disappointed because I've skipped this "step". I've seen people recommend dish soap and not recommend dish soap. There are specifically designed car soaps that will strip wax/sealants as well which if I was going to do it I would use. Honestly if you're considering a full detail chances are that most of the old stuff is gone anyway right? The caveat here is if you are using a coating as your last step and it specifically calls out a step for stripping/decon/prepping I would follow it to make sure you are getting the best results in terms of longevity.

      Claying should only be done if the paint is contaminated enough to require it. After your wash, get a Ziploc bag and put your hand inside and lightly touch the paint in dirt gathering areas first. If it feels rough then claying is worthwhile. If it feels smooth then just skip it. No point in doing clay if its not needed as you can actually introduce marring from claying. As a side note I no longer use clay and I've switched to the synthetic glove type things that can be hosed off as I always ended up dropping the clay on the ground . Some people skip clay altogether and just add a decon spray like Iron-X to their wash process. I've done both and I feel that if your car isn't terribly contaminated the Iron-X is fine. Again, this all depends on your time commitment. You are already doing more than most people will ever do.

      Your thought is correct on polishing. Use the least aggressive process that will give you the results you are looking for. Only you can make the call on this as it depends on how bad the paint is and where you draw the line as to what looks good enough to you. There no point in doing a 2 step paint correction if you personally do not see a difference at the end of the day. I've done 1 step and 2 steps but it just depended on how bad the car was at the time.

      One step that I just added the last time I went through a full detail was an IPA wipedown after polishing prior to the protection step. This isn't that time consuming and doesn't require any fancy products that you'd have to buy over the internet. Just a spray bottle, MF towel, and some 70% Isopropyl alcohol mixed 1:1 with distilled water. It removes any oils after polishing and ensures a clean surface for your last step. I feel it helped my sealant adhere better and I noticed better longevity than the prior details. Once again if you are going coating follow its directions in regards to prep.

      Sealing/Waxing/Coating is the protection step. In this thread many people are talking about the pro's of a coating as compared to a sealant or wax. After years of using sealants and spending hours upon hours following the standard approach you outline above I will be moving to a coating during my next full detail due to the time cut in maintenance washing/drying after a coating is applied. I just do not have as much time to spend washing the car as I did when I was younger and single. The con's are that the coatings tend to be a bit more expensive than some of your standard sealants/waxes and the application/removal process may be a bit more challenging for a DIY'r. Each coating seems to be different in terms of application. Whatever your choice is for the protection step just make sure to follow the directions for it and you'll be fine.

      Once again my approach to this is probably different than others or pros but just sharing what has worked for me.
      Last edited by steelgatorb8; 05-16-2018 at 02:23 PM.

    26. 05-16-2018 02:47 PM #50
      Quote Originally Posted by ohiodub_99.5 View Post
      I may have missed it, but OP, where are you located?
      Twin Cities.

      I went with the McKee's 37 products. Bought the new SiO2 formula paint coating (supposed to be much easier to work with than the original version), the wheel coating, and then their hydro blue top off that you just spray on the car during a wash and rinse off to top it off. I also bought CarPro Iron-X because for the first time in my driving life I have tiny rust specs on the Tiguan behind the wheels, presumably from brake dust particles. Paid $135 for the McKee's stuff with a 10% coupon, and got the Iron-X for like $25 from Amazon. Then another $30 or so to top off my genreal soap n sh!t supplies that were running low.

      Haven't tried any of it yet, hopefully next weekend.

      My plan is to do this once a year in the spring or after the spring thunderstorms, then do a hand wash and hydro-blue top off mid summer and in fall before the snow. Should beat the hell out of X coats of glaze/seal/wax that don't last more than a few weeks.

      I did email McKee's and ask if they recommended one coat or two, they said just one but I'm not sure about that. Kinda hard for me not to do two.
      Last edited by puma1552; 05-16-2018 at 02:51 PM.

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