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    1. Member 24vGTiVR6's Avatar
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      12-29-2014 01:49 AM #76
      Probably


      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
      Last edited by 24vGTiVR6; 12-29-2014 at 02:57 PM.

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    3. 12-29-2014 05:27 PM #77
      Installing transmission turned to be a little bit more involving. I had to use a second mount point located towards the rear to hang transmission on two nylon straps and raise it slowly by jacking up either front or rear of transmission.



      Here're the torque specs as per Bentley manual:

      Engine to transmisison - M12 bolts - 80 Nm. These are bolts #1, #3, #5, #9 and #11 on picture posted on previous page.
      Engine to transmisison - M10 bolts - 60 Nm. These are bolts #6, #7 and #8 on the same picture.
      Pendulum support to transmission - 80Nm + 90' (1/4 of the turn).
      Pendulum support to subframe - 200Nm.
      Starter to transmission - 45 Nm.
      Drive shaft to flange - 80Nm. Bentley manual suggests to replace these bolts, but I didn't.
      Large hex bolt on drive shaft - 150Nm + 90' (1/4 of the turn). Bentley manual suggests to replace these bolts, but I didn't.
      Torque converter to flywheel (three nuts)- 60 Nm

      -albertr
      Last edited by albertr; 01-20-2015 at 07:59 AM.

    4. Junior Member
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      03-28-2015 11:49 AM #78
      Can the upper timing cover be removed without taking the valve cover off? I'm trying to remove the VVT solenoids. I've removed all the bolts and the thermostat housing and it won't come off. Thanks

    5. Member Xtremjeepn's Avatar
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      03-28-2015 01:38 PM #79
      Quote Originally Posted by jackrosenfeld View Post
      Can the upper timing cover be removed without taking the valve cover off? I'm trying to remove the VVT solenoids. I've removed all the bolts and the thermostat housing and it won't come off. Thanks
      No. There are two long bolts that stick yo from the upper timing cover through the valve cover.

    6. Junior Member
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      03-28-2015 01:43 PM #80
      That's what I thought. Thanks! Going to remove the alternator and secondary air pump now...

    7. Member Xtremjeepn's Avatar
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      03-28-2015 02:14 PM #81
      Quote Originally Posted by jackrosenfeld View Post
      That's what I thought. Thanks! Going to remove the alternator and secondary air pump now...
      Why would you remove the alternator?

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      03-28-2015 02:17 PM #82
      To take off the intake manifold. It is blocking the lower manifold screws.

    9. Member Xtremjeepn's Avatar
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      03-28-2015 02:21 PM #83
      Quote Originally Posted by jackrosenfeld View Post
      To take off the intake manifold. It is blocking the lower manifold screws.



      If you say so . I've done this a few times and never removed it









    10. Junior Member
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      03-28-2015 02:27 PM #84
      Nice valve cover This is basically my first time doing work this involved. Crossing my fingers that I don't see the infamous worn intermediate sprocket. This car is so hard to work on

    11. Member Xtremjeepn's Avatar
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      03-28-2015 02:29 PM #85
      Quote Originally Posted by jackrosenfeld View Post
      Nice valve cover This is basically my first time doing work this involved. Crossing my fingers that I don't see the infamous worn intermediate sprocket. This car is so hard to work on

      The worn sprocket is really isolated to the 12v engines. Yours should be fine.


      Removing that alternator is no biggie. Just teasing you about it.

    12. Junior Member
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      03-28-2015 03:34 PM #86
      Haha. Okay. My engine was starting up and idling fine when cold, but once it got out of the "high idle" period, it would run rough and quit. I was sometimes able to keep it going by pressing on the gas, but it would eventually die. This leads me to the conclusion that the VVT system is clogged up (probably by that stupid screen).

      I pulled the cam position sensors and noticed that there were layers of dried oil sludge on them. Could this have also been a culprit of the rough idle? Maybe affecting spark timing? I can't imagine what's on the solenoids if I found that much sludge on the sensors alone.

    13. Member
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      03-29-2015 08:30 AM #87
      Quote Originally Posted by jackrosenfeld View Post
      Haha. Okay. My engine was starting up and idling fine when cold, but once it got out of the "high idle" period, it would run rough and quit. I was sometimes able to keep it going by pressing on the gas, but it would eventually die. This leads me to the conclusion that the VVT system is clogged up (probably by that stupid screen). :
      I don't understand how you get to that conclusion. Lots of things can cause similar symptoms.
      Are you tossing cam codes?

    14. Junior Member
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      03-29-2015 10:58 AM #88
      In previous posts, Xtremjeepn talked about how the broken screen could have been forcing the cams into a retarded or advanced state. I thought I would pull the plungers out and see if the screen is broken and jammed into the solenoid, restricting movement. I'm also going to pull all the sensors I can to clean them just in case the sludge that's dried on them is causing false readings.

      I'm really new to engines in general and don't have much experience with mechanical work... So I'm kind of just "winging it". I don't have a scanner, but I should probably purchase one if I'm going to be working on this car again. Forgive me if I sound like a total dummy talking about this stuff.

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      03-31-2015 05:38 PM #89
      Just pulled my crank sensor... Was dirty and had small metal shavings stuck to it. Maybe a contributor to the rough start and idle problems I was having? Possibly throwing off ignition timing? I'm guessing it's a mixture of the dirty cam and crank sensors.

      I haven't been able to get the manifold off yet because I rounded off one of the air pump bolts It's the only thing keeping me from getting to the solenoids.

    16. Junior Member
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      04-02-2015 05:36 PM #90
      Anyone have trouble pulling the VVT actuators? I've got the two screws out and I'm pulling on it with significant force. I'm scared I'm breaking it.
      Last edited by jackrosenfeld; 04-02-2015 at 08:23 PM.

    17. Junior Member
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      04-02-2015 11:06 PM #91
      Another question... Where do you guys get your stretch bolts from? The ones that hold the adjusters onto the cams. Thanks!

    18. Member
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      04-03-2015 01:35 PM #92
      Quote Originally Posted by jackrosenfeld View Post
      In previous posts, Xtremjeepn talked about how the broken screen could have been forcing the cams into a retarded or advanced state. I thought I would pull the plungers out and see if the screen is broken and jammed into the solenoid, restricting movement. I'm also going to pull all the sensors I can to clean them just in case the sludge that's dried on them is causing false readings.

      I'm really new to engines in general and don't have much experience with mechanical work... So I'm kind of just "winging it". I don't have a scanner, but I should probably purchase one if I'm going to be working on this car again. Forgive me if I sound like a total dummy talking about this stuff.
      So you are tearing the engine apart, and pulling vvt assemblies because it runs rough and someone else ran rough and that's what it was?
      If that's all your going on, that's just crazy.

      Is your MIL on? Your not gonna get anywhere without a code reader.

      FWIW there would be a crank/correlation code if the vvt was the problem.

    19. Junior Member
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      04-04-2015 08:47 AM #93
      Yep, I'm pretty crazy for doing this!

      My check engine light is on. The rough running problem was intermittent, which lead me to believe that maybe the oil passages in the VVT system are clogged up by the screen or carbon deposits. There's some serious baked on oil sludge on the adjusters, so there's probably worse inside.

      I'm pretty sure my mechanic scanned it and was getting cam codes or misfire codes (can't remember which one), but since the engine sometimes ran nicely, and with all of these problems people are having with the VVT, I'm thinking it's the problem.

      I do understand, however, that this problem could be a whole bunch of things. As I mentioned earlier, my crank sensor had tiny metal shavings sticking to the tip of it, and my cam sensors had a TON of dried oil sludge on them. Probably to the point that it could have caused false readings.

      I should really borrow a code reader from someone once I've got this thing back together

    20. 05-12-2015 03:52 PM #94
      Like previous poster said, you'll need to read the fault codes first.
      I don;t remember any troubles with removing actuators. Just work it slowly and carefully to not damage them.
      I got stretch bolts from local VW dealer. Bolts are not very expensive, and local dealer is close to my house, so it was a matter of convenience.

      -albertr

    21. 11-18-2016 03:34 PM #95
      Quote Originally Posted by albertr View Post
      Testing VVT actuators using 9V battery.



      Installing VVT housing after cleaning carbon deposits and removing broken screen which sits between housing and head. New top plastic rail. Metal seal rings on camshafts need to be oiled and then housing just slides in without using any force. If it doesn't go in, re-align the seal rings to center them and try again. Four bolts which hold VVT housing needs to be replaced as per Bentley manual and torqued to 8 Nm.



      Soaking cam adjusters in motor oil after cleaning and before installation.



      When installing adjusters and before putting in the upper chain we need to make sure that adjusters are fully rotated counter clock-wise (preferably with oil inside) in the direction of the arrow until complete stop:



      Adjusters have a dowel pin and can only be installed in one position related to the camshaft (the same goes for both intermediate shaft sprockets). Camshaft bolts are stretch bolts and need to be replaced and torqued to 60 Nm + additional 90' (1/4 of the turn). Bentley manual suggests to have bolts and surface of the adjacent components (whether adjusters or sprockets) be clean and dry (not contaminated with oil) so correct torque specs can be achieved. Intake adjuster is marked as "24E" while exhaust adjuster is marked as "32A". They are different and cannot be interchanged.

      Here's a picture of improvised tool to hold camshafts in place while removing/installing adjusters.



      On 24V VR6 engine camshafts are lined up (as opposed to 12V design), so "locking tool" is ... well, pretty straight ;-)



      New chain was put in. There are no milled tooth on adjuster sprocket. Instead there's a laser-etched arrow engraved next to adjusters marking ("24E" on intake adjuster or "32A" on exhaust adjuster). There should be exactly 16 rollers between these arrows.



      If the upper chain has colored links, it makes it visually easier to count 16 rollers.



      I'm not quite sure on purpose of these three colored links... As you can see, the intermediate shaft sprocket is timed to 6 o'clock, and the notch on small sprocket is located across the middle colored link... It looks like it will be located right next to the middle link should it be timed to 12 o'clock... Maybe that was the original purpose of these three links - to give a visual indication of upper chain related to intermediate sprocket?



      The following excellent DYI was a big help since there seem to be not that many differences between 12V and 24V VR6: DIY - Replacing timing chains, tensioners and guides on a 12v VR6

      -albertr
      seen many write ups on how to install the cam adjusters, and some say turn all the way to the right (clockwise), and some say left (counter clockwise). I'm going to replace my head gasket this weekend, and I've marked everything but just in case, which way do i preload the adjusters. colckwise, or counter clockwise?....thanks

    22. 02-15-2017 11:54 PM #96
      Hello all,
      (Note: I'm a novice compared to this discussion but believe I have been able to follow it, my apologies if not dead on...)

      I hope to revive this thread as I have the same '03 Eurovan VR6 24valve with identical symptoms, same codes and diagnosis from local shop as a timing chain. I have no chain noise but same high carbon build up. Replaced a crusty camshaft position sensor to no avail (man that would've been nice) so took it to a local shop who said it is a $4.2K job (after $450 in serial testing). I said give me the keys and hobbled back home by keeping foot on gas and break at stops to keep above 1K rpms (stalls out intermittently at idle, but hate doing it to this notorious transmission). Sitting at home wondering what to do w/ this van that clearly nobody wants to work on (even Oil Can Henry's said "we don't do those" geez). Then I recalled that they said the engine vacuum was very low (something like 4psi vs 18psi spec). Compression was fine and they said all hoses were fixed (replaced a T-connector hose to master cylinder or something rather?) but I'd think a poor vacuum would have something to do with the timing issue, somehow or another. I've noticed a black vacuum device on front left of engine resembling the old school carb/vacuum/advance but connected to the block not to the distributor (I don't believe it has one w/ coil packs over plugs). I'm grabbing at straws but hoping to avoid dropping the engine/trans to find no problem like the originator of this thread. Who knows, maybe a rigorous soaking of engine/injector w/ solvent or something would blow out a chunk of something else and get the vacuum back up? Or is it possible that the ECM needs time to adjust to new parts? Please throw out any guidance on the source of low engine vacuum because I'd hate to have this awesome vehicle end up as the guest house up at the well! (just can't part w/ it - too many good memories)

      Sorry for the long email... hope it makes sense...

      Thanks,

      Mike

    23. 07-20-2017 11:03 AM #97
      I was reading your thread but it ended without resolution, I have the same problem. I took my engine out to replace the timing chain and gear and to my surprise everything was in perfect condition, just like yours. I'm at a loss. Could it be the vvt solenoid?

    24. Junior Member
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      08-10-2017 01:42 PM #98
      Following the steps outlined for the 01P Eurovan transmission removal best I can; but have a few challenges.

      1. Should the oil filter holder be removed from the engine block? It might be getting in the way of one of the bolts connecting the engine to the transmission. If so, is it best to drain the oil first or is this part over the resting oil level? It also looks like this gets in the way of the engine support hole at the bottom of the block. *EDIT* I drained the oil from the filter (via the allen screw on the bottom) and just unbolded this device and then hung it with a wire from an intake manifold bolt. This made it much easier to get on one of the bolts going from the engine to the transmission.

      2. Removed the thermostat housing, but am not sure if the "crack pipe" needs to be removed as well. Looks like I can get to everything, but it may be more limited once the engine support is installed. *EDIT* I left the cooling pipe in place, it didn't get in the way of the transmission removal.

      3. Am considering taking off the eight nuts that hold the exhaust manifold to the exhaust pipe (also considering just removing the bolts at the cat converter instead). Any tips on the best angle to get at the nuts? Do people work from the top or the bottom on these? For example, I can get a short wrench on the nuts from the top or a long socket and some extension and wobble fittings from the bottom. Neither is great if these turn out to be really rusted on. *EDIT* Like Albertr did in previous posts, I took out the 3 bolts that connect the down pipe to the cat converter and found that the engine had plenty of room to move to get the transmission out. Some mechanics I've talked to don't remove anything at all from the exhaust and manage to get the transmissions both in and out.

      4. There is a special place in hell reserved for people who use the wrong tool when working on cars. The two triple squared bolt heads on the passenger side ball joint are messed up from someone inserting the wrong tool in there. I can't get my triple squared bit to fit in. Am considering hammering in an Allen bit to see if I get enough purchase to get the bolts out but am not sure if it will work (any other clever ideas to remove these bolts are welcome!). Everything else for the axle removal has been done. Would I be able to get the 'intermediate' drive shaft out the transmission if I remove it's bracket and just work around this unbolted drive shaft while it is still in the wheel hub? *Edit* I was able to take off the nut from the lower ball joint and release the wheel hub there. One of the two bolts came out, the other messed up one is still in there. When I get the van running again I'll take it to someone who has more extraction bits to work on.

      5. Finally, any tips on holding the crankshaft while removing the flywheel? I'm not there yet, but am unsure about how I'll go about this. *Edit* This was actually easy. I just set up my socket wrench on the 27mm flywheel bolt and fixed an attached cheater bar to the suspension arms and that held it in place while I took out the bolts on the other side.

      Thanks!
      Last edited by kite_rider; 08-18-2017 at 03:11 PM. Reason: Figured it out...

    25. 05-14-2019 10:39 AM #99
      Quote Originally Posted by cos140 View Post
      Well, after spending many hours stripping my engine down I found the culprit and it was as shown previously in this thread!!

      I removed the VVT housing and hey presto, the gauze had been punctured. A big sigh of relief as the fault was found.







      I contacted A few Specialised VW Engine Tuning specialists and they all said that they have removed the gauze and debris and simply ensured that the oil is changed more often and make sure its good oil, not some cheap supermarket stuff.

      This is how I put housing back on, minus the gauze. I cut out the remains then used a file to make sure it all was smooth and free from swarf. Clean and then put into housing.





      The engine fired up straight away and smooth tickover is back.

      Happy days!!
      I know this is a looooong time ago, but how did this run with no gauze?

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