Fourtitude.com - Go ahead...ask those car questions you were always afraid to ask...
Username or Email Address
Do you already have an account?
Forgot your password?
  • Log in or Sign up

    Fourtitude.com


    Page 223 of 296 FirstFirst ... 123173213219220221222223224225226227233273 ... LastLast
    Results 5,551 to 5,575 of 7395
    1. Member EUROTHRASH's Avatar
      Join Date
      Oct 25th, 2007
      Location
      Boston, MA
      Posts
      545
      Cars
      2004 Volvo S60R
      11-21-2015 01:27 PM #5551
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      It's easier to pull a fuse and use a test light across the terminals. The degree of brightness tells you the draw.
      Perhaps it's not as big a project as I thought. Would I have to fiddle with the harness? I can say without a doubt, that I'm not comfortable doing that.
      Never run out of real estate, traction, and ideas at the same time

      l
      2004 Volvo S60R- Current l 1999 BMW M3 5.0- Sold l 2008 Mitubishi Evolution GSR- Sold l 2006 CBR 600rr - Sold l 2001 Ducati 748 Biposto - Sold l 1993 MR2 Turbo - Sold l 2006 Buell XB12 SCG - Sold l 1991 Jetta GLI VR6 - Sold l 1991 Volkswagen Corrado G60 - Sold l

    2. Remove Advertisements

      Advertisements
       

    3. Member barry2952's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 13th, 2007
      Location
      Farmington Hills, MI
      Posts
      18,431
      11-21-2015 01:45 PM #5552
      Quote Originally Posted by EUROTHRASH View Post
      Perhaps it's not as big a project as I thought. Would I have to fiddle with the harness? I can say without a doubt, that I'm not comfortable doing that.
      This is a voltage probe. Normally you hook one end to ground to see if you have voltage at a particular connection. Used as a draw tester you just pull a fuse and touch one side with the clip and one side with the probe.

      A large draw will make the light quite bright as the current is running through a tiny bulb filament. A small draw will be harder to distinguish so you may have to do it in a darkened

      area. You won't have to touch the harness for this troubleshooting.

      Last edited by barry2952; 11-21-2015 at 01:47 PM.

    4. Member EUROTHRASH's Avatar
      Join Date
      Oct 25th, 2007
      Location
      Boston, MA
      Posts
      545
      Cars
      2004 Volvo S60R
      11-21-2015 02:10 PM #5553
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      This is a voltage probe. Normally you hook one end to ground to see if you have voltage at a particular connection. Used as a draw tester you just pull a fuse and touch one side with the clip and one side with the probe.

      A large draw will make the light quite bright as the current is running through a tiny bulb filament. A small draw will be harder to distinguish so you may have to do it in a darkened

      area. You won't have to touch the harness for this troubleshooting.

      A simple enough process. Thanks for the advice!
      Never run out of real estate, traction, and ideas at the same time

      l
      2004 Volvo S60R- Current l 1999 BMW M3 5.0- Sold l 2008 Mitubishi Evolution GSR- Sold l 2006 CBR 600rr - Sold l 2001 Ducati 748 Biposto - Sold l 1993 MR2 Turbo - Sold l 2006 Buell XB12 SCG - Sold l 1991 Jetta GLI VR6 - Sold l 1991 Volkswagen Corrado G60 - Sold l

    5. Member GTijoejoe's Avatar
      Join Date
      Oct 5th, 2001
      Posts
      7,981
      Cars
      '06 Evo Mr, '17 Ridgeline RTL, '18 Accord Sport
      11-23-2015 10:46 AM #5554
      I can tell there is certainly some confusion about drums vs disk brakes.
      Keep in mind the pro's and con's are not about how the parts are designed but how they actually function.

      I can design a disk brake to have more heat capacity than a drum, more pad area, and be heaver than a drum brake system.
      Comparing to these metrics would leave you confused and uneducated.

      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      I don't know about heat capacity, but brake shoes have more friction surface than brake pads. Drums trap heat, so they aren't great for race cars, but how many people actually track their car? Fewer than those that say they do, I'm sure.

      Disc brakes do regenerate their braking power faster than drum after driving through deep water, but how often does that happen?
      There are many reasons why racecars don't use drum brakes.
      Weight, service, complexity, thermal management, modulation, pedal feeling.

      The largest benefit of a racecar is dedicated cooling and high speed, this significantly cuts down on the heat capacity demand required by a disk.
      This is opposite say for a tractor. Low speed, virtually no cooling. Even if the brake energy where the same racecar vs tractor, the tractor can't shed the heat and would require more capacity in the disk/drum.


      Quote Originally Posted by VDub2625 View Post
      Strange thing I've noticed is, with the Mk6 Jetta at least, the drums cost way more to replace than the discs. Rear discs (parts only, that's my dept) run $180-200, rear drums are $360. And they don't seem to last longer... I've sold them on cars with 40-60k, and my Mk6 Golf's 4 wheel discs are still OE at 72k...
      Drum brakes are dirt cheap. A typical drum brake corner cost less than a disk caliper alone.
      From the service sales side, you are seeing the cause and effect from a low volume product vs high volume product based on a strategy by the OE. If you look at various vehicle line ups, if they are equipped with drums its usually the lowest grade, that's because of cost.
      2.0T+034efi+meth = 300+whp = RIP

      Quote Originally Posted by Ryukein View Post
      Everyone always praises function over form until the form is something that they don't like

    6. Member cuppie's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 3rd, 2005
      Location
      Redford, MI
      Posts
      4,327
      Cars
      88 Scirocco 16v (Wilda); 02 Passat 1.8T wagon (the Brick); 09 Jetta Sportwagon (wife's.) Past: lots
      11-23-2015 12:16 PM #5555
      Quote Originally Posted by jmaddocks View Post
      x2

      Run one of your battery cables through an ammeter, then start pulling fuses until you find the circuit with the current draw.
      Excellent way to start. Tells you what the total draw is.
      For best results, use a clamp-on ammeter. Breaking the circuit can (sometimes) 'fix' the draw (temporarily.)

      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      It's easier to pull a fuse and use a test light across the terminals. The degree of brightness tells you the draw.
      Even easier: do a voltage drop check across each fuse. It's 100% non-invasive, and 100% accurate (assuming that your meter is accurate in its low mV DC range.)
      http://info.powerprobe.com/fusechartsdownload
      - Cup
      '88 Scirocco 16v, 'tastefully' modified.
      '02 Passat 1.8T (The Brick.)
      things currently broken (Scirocco): 4
      things currently broken (Passat): 2

    7. Member
      Join Date
      Oct 18th, 2007
      Posts
      174
      Cars
      2002 Audi TT
      11-23-2015 12:25 PM #5556
      Quote Originally Posted by EUROTHRASH View Post
      Hello everyone,

      Currently I have a 5.0 swapped e36 m3, with some sort of draw that kills the battery over a few days if I don't drive it. My question is, can I install a battery shut off and switch that every time I park to stop the draw?
      I have this same problem with my truck. Max it can sit before the battery is dead is 4 days.

      Thank you all for the advice on how to find the problem!

    8. Junior Member Juicebox432's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jul 18th, 2013
      Location
      Charleston, SC
      Posts
      31
      Cars
      '67 Spridget, '12 Mini, '11 Daytona 675
      11-23-2015 12:50 PM #5557
      What can cause an off idle acceleration bog when the engine is fully warmed up? This is in my spridget.
      When the engine is cool, the off idle acceleration is excellent. It's fine for about 10 miles but then gets worse the more miles I go once the engine fully warms up.

      I've switched to heavier weight oil in the dashpots to keep the pistons from raising too fast, the car still bogs off idle when hot.
      The timing is correct and doesn't jump around it used to with the old Lucas 25D.
      The SU needles are centered when fully seated and the floats are set to spec.

      I rebuilt the carbs last summer with all new parts, the ignition coil (Lucas Sport) is two years old, new wires, new plugs, and the distributor is a new Pertronix unit replaced earlier this year.

      I'm a bit confused as to what's causing the bog.

    9. Member saron81's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 22nd, 2006
      Location
      Maryland
      Posts
      5,184
      Cars
      Fiesta ST, Flex
      11-23-2015 12:54 PM #5558
      Still sounds like the floats may be sticking and it's loading up. Have you considered the Grose jets to see if that fixes it?

    10. Member Elite_Deforce's Avatar
      Join Date
      Nov 18th, 2012
      Location
      Ottawa-Gatineau
      Posts
      8,568
      Cars
      2012 Mustang GT, 1986 Mazda RX-7 GX, 2007 Kawasaki Ninja 250R
      11-27-2015 10:07 AM #5559
      So my Mazda3's AC compressor went up in smoke this year which is ok since I don't need it that often anyway. Instead of spending $$ to fix it, I just cut the belt running it (only thing running on that belt). The problem is, my car has the supah fawnsay auto climate system, so by design it kicks on AC in a lot of conditions. Does running AC without actually having a working compressor bad? Am I forcing any other parts unnecessarily? I know the fan kicks on when it detects AC is activated, but other than that I'm not sure. Should I also pull the AC relay?
      Quote Originally Posted by Sonderwunsch View Post
      People have been complaining about modern BMWs lacking steering feel so they are adding torque steer.
      Quote Originally Posted by Ernie McCracken View Post
      I don't trust the judgment of anyone who likes black wheels.
      Quote Originally Posted by BRealistic View Post
      I find it ironic that long time Euro brand fans would assume long term reliability issues would destroy any love of a unique product.

    11. Moderator the brit's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 23rd, 2003
      Location
      Pottstown, PA
      Posts
      22,004
      Cars
      VW Fox 16v
      11-27-2015 10:42 AM #5560
      Quote Originally Posted by Elite_Deforce View Post
      So my Mazda3's AC compressor went up in smoke this year which is ok since I don't need it that often anyway. Instead of spending $$ to fix it, I just cut the belt running it (only thing running on that belt). The problem is, my car has the supah fawnsay auto climate system, so by design it kicks on AC in a lot of conditions. Does running AC without actually having a working compressor bad? Am I forcing any other parts unnecessarily? I know the fan kicks on when it detects AC is activated, but other than that I'm not sure. Should I also pull the AC relay?
      You won't be "running AC" (as you know..), your car will just be trying to switch the compressor on by engaging the clutch which is controlled by a electromagnet. So with the belt removed, the system will supply +12v when it wants it to turn on, the clutch will engage, and nothing will happen. That's about it. If you don't want to output the 12v, you could remove the relay, but it won't really change anything.

      The only annoying thing would be if your fancy auto climate system tries to increase the cabin fan speed etc trying to make the cabin cool down faster etc. I hate it when cars do this when the A/C system hasn't got up to speed yet as they're just blowing warm out really fast. Switching the system manually to slower speeds or a different temp etc normally stops it pretty quickly.

    12. Member Elite_Deforce's Avatar
      Join Date
      Nov 18th, 2012
      Location
      Ottawa-Gatineau
      Posts
      8,568
      Cars
      2012 Mustang GT, 1986 Mazda RX-7 GX, 2007 Kawasaki Ninja 250R
      11-27-2015 11:45 AM #5561
      Quote Originally Posted by the brit View Post
      You won't be "running AC" (as you know..), your car will just be trying to switch the compressor on by engaging the clutch which is controlled by a electromagnet. So with the belt removed, the system will supply +12v when it wants it to turn on, the clutch will engage, and nothing will happen. That's about it. If you don't want to output the 12v, you could remove the relay, but it won't really change anything.

      The only annoying thing would be if your fancy auto climate system tries to increase the cabin fan speed etc trying to make the cabin cool down faster etc. I hate it when cars do this when the A/C system hasn't got up to speed yet as they're just blowing warm out really fast. Switching the system manually to slower speeds or a different temp etc normally stops it pretty quickly.
      Thanks. Lucky my fancy auto system isn't fancy enough to do that. I'm gonna pull the relay if anything but to reduce draw.

      Bonus question: how long do you think the rest of the AC components will last without them needing to be repaired without being run?
      Quote Originally Posted by Sonderwunsch View Post
      People have been complaining about modern BMWs lacking steering feel so they are adding torque steer.
      Quote Originally Posted by Ernie McCracken View Post
      I don't trust the judgment of anyone who likes black wheels.
      Quote Originally Posted by BRealistic View Post
      I find it ironic that long time Euro brand fans would assume long term reliability issues would destroy any love of a unique product.

    13. Geriatric Member VDub2625's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jan 3rd, 2003
      Location
      Fall River, MA
      Posts
      47,922
      Cars
      12 Golf 2.5, 90 Jetta GLI 16v, 99.5 Cabrio Highline, 92 Golf GL
      11-27-2015 12:07 PM #5562
      Quote Originally Posted by Elite_Deforce View Post
      I'm gonna pull the relay if anything but to reduce draw.
      it's a miniscule draw, not anything to worry about. i wouldn't mess more than just removing the belt.

      How did the compressor 'blow up'?

      When there is low pressure in the ac system (such as a blown line etc), there are sensors to stop it from kicking on the clutch anyway. Depends on how your compressor blew.

      Did the clutch kick in with the compressor "blown up" but with the AC on? If so, pressure is good and just the compressor is bad. if not, then there might be other things wrong.

      If the system still has pressure, it'll be fine not being used indefinitely.
      A2Resource
      .......

    14. Member Elite_Deforce's Avatar
      Join Date
      Nov 18th, 2012
      Location
      Ottawa-Gatineau
      Posts
      8,568
      Cars
      2012 Mustang GT, 1986 Mazda RX-7 GX, 2007 Kawasaki Ninja 250R
      11-27-2015 01:36 PM #5563
      Quote Originally Posted by VDub2625 View Post
      it's a miniscule draw, not anything to worry about. i wouldn't mess more than just removing the belt.

      How did the compressor 'blow up'?

      When there is low pressure in the ac system (such as a blown line etc), there are sensors to stop it from kicking on the clutch anyway. Depends on how your compressor blew.

      Did the clutch kick in with the compressor "blown up" but with the AC on? If so, pressure is good and just the compressor is bad. if not, then there might be other things wrong.

      If the system still has pressure, it'll be fine not being used indefinitely.
      Compressor is dead, mechanic/family friend confirmed and it was rattling like a few nuts in a tin can real bad right after it went. Compressors are notoriously unreliable in these cars anyway, I'm sure the fancy auto climate system didn't help. Same for the automatic starter that the PO told me had a feature that would "Start and run the car for 3 min every hour overnight to keep it warm". I'm expecting my starter motor to go at any time because of that.
      Quote Originally Posted by Sonderwunsch View Post
      People have been complaining about modern BMWs lacking steering feel so they are adding torque steer.
      Quote Originally Posted by Ernie McCracken View Post
      I don't trust the judgment of anyone who likes black wheels.
      Quote Originally Posted by BRealistic View Post
      I find it ironic that long time Euro brand fans would assume long term reliability issues would destroy any love of a unique product.

    15. Member VWmk3GTI's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 3rd, 2013
      Posts
      1,296
      Cars
      1998 Golf GTI, 1968 Beetle,2003 Passat GLX,Some mini bikes
      11-29-2015 12:13 AM #5564
      if I put 89 octane in a car that normally uses 87,What affects would it have on the engine
      Quote Originally Posted by PlatinumGLS View Post
      I’m not judgmental, so when I see a person push the wrong pedal, I never assume what gender she is.
      Quote Originally Posted by Crimping Is Easy View Post
      Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in his shoes. That way, when you criticize him, you're a mile away and you have his shoes.

    16. Member J2G's Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 8th, 2012
      Location
      Toronto
      Posts
      2,217
      Cars
      2001 Accord
      11-29-2015 12:20 AM #5565
      Nothing. Absolutely nothing.
      Quote Originally Posted by compy222 View Post
      every on ramp was full of the sound of evil thunder consuming the spent souls of thousands of dinosaurs a minute.

    17. Member
      Join Date
      Nov 10th, 2008
      Location
      Beverly Hills, CA
      Posts
      5,107
      Cars
      2008 Viper, Prior: 2006 Gallardo Spyder, 2001 Miata, 2006 Corvette, 2008 Ninja 650, 1999 Lexus GS400
      11-29-2015 12:29 AM #5566
      Does anybody know why the McLaren F1 had such poor skidpad (0.86g) and slalom (64.5mph) times when tested by Road and Track? Surely these numbers aren't indicative of what this car is capable of

      http://www.roadandtrack.com/new-cars...es-mclaren-f1/
      "Plenty of poseurs drive all sorts of sports cars, but poseurs won’t survive the Viper"-Car and Driver

    18. Geriatric Member VDub2625's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jan 3rd, 2003
      Location
      Fall River, MA
      Posts
      47,922
      Cars
      12 Golf 2.5, 90 Jetta GLI 16v, 99.5 Cabrio Highline, 92 Golf GL
      11-30-2015 08:02 AM #5567
      Quote Originally Posted by VWmk3GTI View Post
      if I put 89 octane in a car that normally uses 87,What affects would it have on the engine
      Quote Originally Posted by J2G View Post
      Nothing. Absolutely nothing.
      Correct, for the most part. And for an explanation why:

      Octane is the fuel's resistance to burn. The lower the grade, the easier it'll burn. An engine designed for 87 means that it has characteristics that work with (relatively) easily-burned fuel (low compression, ignition timing, etc). An engine that is designed for 87 filled with 89 won't do anything extra with that resistance to burn. But an engine designed for 89, or 91 etc, will be designed in a way that 87 would pre-detonate (due to compression, retarded timing, etc). This is knock, and it's bad. But the other way doesn't do anything, good or bad, in most cases.

      There are a lot of cars being built now that are "designed" to run on 87 (the compression is designed to work with 87, and the ECU will notice the knock and adjust the timing accordingly to reduce it). This lowers power and economy. But, the gas door may say "87 required" but putting "93" in it will get better results, even though for all appearances the engine runs fine on both. The owner's manuals will state if it can take advantage of the higher octane.
      A2Resource
      .......

    19. Member TwoLitreVW's Avatar
      Join Date
      Mar 16th, 2000
      Location
      MIA
      Posts
      13,414
      Cars
      i've a horse outside.
      11-30-2015 05:06 PM #5568
      Quote Originally Posted by VDub2625 View Post
      Correct, for the most part. And for an explanation why:

      Octane is the fuel's resistance to burn. The lower the grade, the easier it'll burn. An engine designed for 87 means that it has characteristics that work with (relatively) easily-burned fuel (low compression, ignition timing, etc). An engine that is designed for 87 filled with 89 won't do anything extra with that resistance to burn. But an engine designed for 89, or 91 etc, will be designed in a way that 87 would pre-detonate (due to compression, retarded timing, etc). This is knock, and it's bad. But the other way doesn't do anything, good or bad, in most cases.

      higher octane allows for more advanced ignition timing.

      the ignition timing gets pulled by the ECU after the knock sensors pick up on the knocking/pinging, thereby also reducing power. retarding the timing is the solution to the knock/ping; not the problem.



      shut your mouth. sh sh shut your mouth.

    20. Member worth_fixing's Avatar
      Join Date
      Dec 23rd, 2009
      Location
      Montreal, Qc
      Posts
      6,876
      Cars
      2014 Mazda3 Sport GS - 1982 Honda CB750K
      11-30-2015 05:13 PM #5569
      Why do trucks compression braking make more noise than the explosions of the engine? I just read a piece on Jake brakes and still don't get why opening the exhaust valve just before TDC on the compression stroke would make more vibration that a full-throttle application.
      http://badges.fuelly.com/images/sig-metric/286588.png
      Any car which holds together for a whole race is too heavy.

    21. Member adrew's Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 14th, 2003
      Location
      Texas
      Posts
      18,461
      Cars
      '12 Yaris, '17 Corolla
      11-30-2015 05:59 PM #5570
      Quote Originally Posted by TwoLitreVW View Post
      higher octane allows for more advanced ignition timing.

      the ignition timing gets pulled by the ECU after the knock sensors pick up on the knocking/pinging, thereby also reducing power. retarding the timing is the solution to the knock/ping; not the problem.
      Tell me if I am imagining this or not. It feels like my car pulls timing (feels like very slight hesitation if I give it a lot of gas at low revs, like if I'm coasting up to a red light in 2nd at 1500 RPM, then floor it when the light turns green). It doesn't do it in the spring/fall/winter but in the summer it is pretty noticeable, especially if it is over 100°F - the car feels like a dog and gets kind of reluctant to rev.

      I tried a few tanks of 89 the last time it was really hot and the hesitation seemed to be exorcised and the car felt peppier and much more willing to rev. Is this all in my brain? I do probably drive the car more spiritedly than the average Yaris owner, running it out to the redline a few times a day. I can't hear any knocking or pinging and the car only requires 87 octane with a relatively low power 1.5-liter engine.
      Improving the signal-to-noise ratio

    22. Geriatric Member VDub2625's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jan 3rd, 2003
      Location
      Fall River, MA
      Posts
      47,922
      Cars
      12 Golf 2.5, 90 Jetta GLI 16v, 99.5 Cabrio Highline, 92 Golf GL
      11-30-2015 06:03 PM #5571
      Quote Originally Posted by TwoLitreVW View Post
      higher octane allows for more advanced ignition timing.

      the ignition timing gets pulled by the ECU after the knock sensors pick up on the knocking/pinging, thereby also reducing power. retarding the timing is the solution to the knock/ping; not the problem.



      Well, I was thinking of it from the perspective of, the car's designed for this radical timing, which is why they require higher octane fuel. Different point of view, I guess, but the same result. The only thing different now is that manufacturers are preparing for it and telling the customer that it's ok to use lower octane fuel, you'll just suffer power loss as a result. I think back in the day engine technology wasn't what it is today, and "allowing" ping to occur before timing is pulled may have been worse than it is now.

      Quote Originally Posted by adrew View Post
      Tell me if I am imagining this or not. It feels like my car pulls timing (feels like very slight hesitation if I give it a lot of gas at low revs, like if I'm coasting up to a red light in 2nd at 1500 RPM, then floor it when the light turns green). It doesn't do it in the spring/fall/winter but in the summer it is pretty noticeable, especially if it is over 100°F - the car feels like a dog and gets kind of reluctant to rev.

      I tried a few tanks of 89 the last time it was really hot and the hesitation seemed to be exorcised and the car felt peppier and much more willing to rev. Is this all in my brain? I do probably drive the car more spiritedly than the average Yaris owner, running it out to the redline a few times a day. I can't hear any knocking or pinging and the car only requires 87 octane with a relatively low power 1.5-liter engine.
      Sounds kinda normal (bogging can cause ping and retarded timing, which can be "fixed" by higher octane, but not necessarily be the right thing to do). Maybe better spark plugs, or a fuel cleaner?
      Last edited by VDub2625; 11-30-2015 at 06:06 PM.
      A2Resource
      .......

    23. Member J2G's Avatar
      Join Date
      Aug 8th, 2012
      Location
      Toronto
      Posts
      2,217
      Cars
      2001 Accord
      11-30-2015 06:53 PM #5572
      I know of people in hot climates (Texas included) who report the same thing, on other cars. I wonder if it has anything to do with intake air temperatures.
      Last edited by J2G; 11-30-2015 at 06:58 PM.
      Quote Originally Posted by compy222 View Post
      every on ramp was full of the sound of evil thunder consuming the spent souls of thousands of dinosaurs a minute.

    24. Member cuppie's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 3rd, 2005
      Location
      Redford, MI
      Posts
      4,327
      Cars
      88 Scirocco 16v (Wilda); 02 Passat 1.8T wagon (the Brick); 09 Jetta Sportwagon (wife's.) Past: lots
      11-30-2015 08:14 PM #5573
      Quote Originally Posted by worth_fixing View Post
      Why do trucks compression braking make more noise than the explosions of the engine? I just read a piece on Jake brakes and still don't get why opening the exhaust valve just before TDC on the compression stroke would make more vibration that a full-throttle application.
      Because a diesel has a compression pressure of (IIRC) close to 600 psi(!).
      Pop the exhaust valves at that kind of pressure, and it's gonna make a bunch of noise.
      On the exhaust stroke (on any engine - diesel or gas), the cylinder pressure is far, far lower (read: not much above ambient.)
      - Cup
      '88 Scirocco 16v, 'tastefully' modified.
      '02 Passat 1.8T (The Brick.)
      things currently broken (Scirocco): 4
      things currently broken (Passat): 2

    25. Member Gear_Cruncher's Avatar
      Join Date
      Mar 28th, 2013
      Location
      USA
      Posts
      4,052
      Cars
      2013 GTI / 2017 GTI / 68 Chevy C10
      12-01-2015 08:54 AM #5574
      Ok ... so

      Say you've been drinking a few to several of those cheap import beers on an empty stomach, you know, the ones that are about 8% or so.... and you decide to whoop up some angel hair pasta. You call the GF and she will be over shortly with her stupid import wine which will just give you a splitting headache later on.

      So, anyway you have the meat sauce all finished, salad is prepared and garlic cheese toast is primed and ready to bake, but you SUDDENLY realize you are totally out of pasta sauce Which car will get you to the store and back before the beer fully kicks in and puts you over the legal OVI limit.... and which will be the safest in case you take out a mail box or some shopping carts on the way there?

      Toyota Supra MkII vintage?
      Acura RSX type S?
      1983 VW GTI?
      1974 Chevy1/2 ton pickup with a 454 and T400?
      2010 Caterpillar 850 hp D11T bulldozer?






      There will be a test later on at the end of this thread to see who got the correct answer
      2017 Mk VII GTI 2013 Mk VI GTI 1974 Kawasaki H2, 2008 Honda CRF150R

    26. Member Nealric's Avatar
      Join Date
      Feb 16th, 2013
      Posts
      7,571
      Cars
      '16 WRX STI, Turbo S3 Alfa Spider, 2020 Ascent
      12-01-2015 09:08 AM #5575
      Quote Originally Posted by 82Turbo930 View Post
      Ok ... so

      Say you've been drinking a few to several of those cheap import beers on an empty stomach, you know, the ones that are about 8% or so.... and you decide to whoop up some angel hair pasta. You call the GF and she will be over shortly with her stupid import wine which will just give you a splitting headache later on.

      So, anyway you have the meat sauce all finished, salad is prepared and garlic cheese toast is primed and ready to bake, but you SUDDENLY realize you are totally out of pasta sauce Which car will get you to the store and back before the beer fully kicks in and puts you over the legal OVI limit.... and which will be the safest in case you take out a mail box or some shopping carts on the way there?

      Toyota Supra MkII vintage?
      Acura RSX type S?
      1983 VW GTI?
      1974 Chevy1/2 ton pickup with a 454 and T400?
      2010 Caterpillar 850 hp D11T bulldozer?






      There will be a test later on at the end of this thread to see who got the correct answer
      Miata.

    Page 223 of 296 FirstFirst ... 123173213219220221222223224225226227233273 ... LastLast

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •