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    1. Member arozanski's Avatar
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      12-02-2015 12:32 PM #101
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      The springs are stamped with the same part number. There are more numbers stamped into the spring, but those numbers are stamped into the smallest spring, not the long one.

      You've piqued my curiosity. Although, I can't imagine a 200 pound driver would make that much of a difference for a car that's sprung for 5,000 pounds.
      I agree, I will see if I can find the discussion in the book, as it always struck me as strange too. That's why it stayed with me, I guess.
      2002 Harley Fat Boy, 2004 Yukon XL Denali, 1993 F-250

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    3. Moderator the brit's Avatar
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      12-02-2015 12:32 PM #102
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      That was a lot to get posted. He can thank Jim, the owner of this car, for handing it over to me. Someone handed it to him at a car show at Greenfield Village.
      The whole community owes a debt of gratitude to Jim and yourself
      | œ Orchid Euro Importation œ |

      Currently driving or working on too many cars...
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    4. Member saron81's Avatar
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      12-02-2015 12:34 PM #103
      I've never seen a Ford car with different L/R rear springs.
      (2nd generation Ford parts guy w/ almost 20 years in.)

    5. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      12-02-2015 12:36 PM #104
      Quote Originally Posted by arozanski View Post
      I agree, I will see if I can find the discussion in the book, as it always struck me as strange too. That's why it stayed with me, I guess.
      I know the battery in my 750il is under the right rear seat as an offset to the driver. I guess it offsets about a leg and a half on me.
      Last edited by barry2952; 12-02-2015 at 12:39 PM.

    6. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      12-02-2015 12:38 PM #105
      Quote Originally Posted by saron81 View Post
      I've never seen a Ford car with different L/R rear springs.
      (2nd generation Ford parts guy w/ almost 20 years in.)
      None of the '40s Ford cars had lefts and rights, either. If they did they would have a suffix, no? If I remember most of the part numbers are different for left and right.

    7. Member saron81's Avatar
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      12-02-2015 12:55 PM #106
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      None of the '40s Ford cars had lefts and rights, either. If they did they would have a suffix, no? If I remember most of the part numbers are different for left and right.
      That is correct. They'd have a different suffix (or at least have a suffix in the case of early part numbers!)
      Some parts change base numbers for lh or rh too. Ie: a 17682 is a RH mirror, and a 17683 is a LH.

    8. Member Rob Cote's Avatar
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      12-02-2015 01:54 PM #107
      yes
      Quote Originally Posted by Hudsone View Post
      No one knows what and where I have to go to them?

    9. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      12-02-2015 09:02 PM #108
      Brute force was the answer. It is fascinating how much deflection you can get out of a spring.



      Bending the spring in 3 locations restored its curvature. They are now nearly identical.



      By the time Dave came by I had blasted a bunch more parts to be powder-coated.



      The next feat was to get the engine off the hoist and onto the engine stand. I'm sure that anyone that's pulled an engine without removing the hood has used a short chain. The problem is that a short chain won't let you lower the engine to the ground for splitting the trans from the block so you have to drop it onto something high, raise the boom and use a longer chain to drop it to the ground.

      The only thing we had handy was Dave's roll-around tool cart. All I've ever heard from Dave since we started working together is how good Snap-on tools and boxes are and this is a perfect testament. That's a heavy big-block.



      Once on the ground the trans could be removed.



      It puked a couple of quarts of trans fluid on separation.



      We swapped the limo's finished 385hp 460 off the engine stand and bolted up the 368.



      Dave is very thorough. We have a set of head gaskets, so it is prudent to pull the heads. I would simply have yanked them off, but Dave wanted to do a leak-down test. There are only two things that leak and that's rings and valves. The procedure is tedious, but oh so telling. The engine is brought to TDC on the compression stroke. The spark plug is replace with an air hose that seals against the head. The hose attaches to a device that has two gauges, a pressure gauge and a gauge that measures the percentage of leak-down.



      Dave say he doesn't think an engine is healthy with over 12%. Some of the cylinders had 4, 6, 9% and two had 26% and 45%. You could hear the air escaping through the exhaust port. Burned valves.



      This is the confirming test. Once the head came off it was turned upside down so that the surface was level. With both valves closed the space was filled with mineral spirits that came pouring out of the exhaust port. When it came in the engine sounded fine, but it wouldn't have, for long. Off to Mid-5 for a valve grind and new valve seals. From the looks of the old head gaskets they were about to go next.



      The block looks pretty fresh. There is no ring ridge at the top of the cylinder and there is plentiful crosshatching remaining in the bore. I'd like to pop the pistons, if for no other reason than to check to see that the piston ring orientation is correct. Their gaps should be 180° from each other.

      There is some carbon build up on the piston crowns but everything looks pretty clean.


    10. Member R32kid's Avatar
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      92 Carrera 4, 11 Tiguan S
      12-03-2015 02:03 AM #109
      I love this!!!

      Now that I am in Chicago, I dont have nearly as far a drive to see these in person, but it is still a trek - definitely count me in on the spring event mentioned!

      Now if only I had the money to have my 964 ran through like this... It needs plenty of help.
      Current: 92 Carrera 4 (His), 11 VW Tiguan S (Hers)
      Past: 91 300TE, 03 C230K, 99 323i, 91 Miata, 04 R32

    11. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      12-03-2015 06:14 PM #110
      Came in to find the other head and the pan pulled. Dark, but clean. Dave will assess.



      It may just require a valve lapping. There was a build-up of carbon around the valve. It definitely required valve guide seals. The broke when flexed.



      These are the rubber boots that take the air from the blower to the heater core. It was cleaned with a combination of lacquer thinner and elbow grease. The lacquer thinner melts the rubber so you have to be cautious to not leave anything wet. This also works well on white wall or raised white letter tires.

      This is the reason everything had to come out. There's this level of overspray on everything.



      These are the two blower motors and fan cages. They are mirror imaged so the right fan cage has to go with the right motor on the correct side of the car. I will be restoring the motors as necessary, but they seemed hardly used and turned freely. They will likely just be cleaned, lubricated and painted.



      I shipped the center link out to California. The supplier said that there are no cores so they had to rebuild the original.

      No huge hurry as we're still not done finding parts to powder-coat. While not hugely complicated this car has a lot more parts than the Ruxton or the Steyr.

    12. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      12-04-2015 08:34 PM #111
      My task for today was to rebuild the heater motors. Surpassingly there was no wear on the bronze bearings, but the wiring was brittle and the insulation cracked off. I cut the leads as short as I dare and spliced appropriate new conductors in using compression ferrules and solder. I covered the splices with two layers of heat shrink tubing.



      I used paper clips to hold back the spring-loaded brushes and reassembled. I wire wheeled the outer case and the motor looks and operates like new.



      I came in this morning to find that Dave had corrected the problem with the motor mounts. No need for elongated holes in the frame.



      I wanted to see some progress on the block today as Dave had deemed the crank, pistons and cam to be good. The next step was decarbonizing the pistons and cylinder walls.



      Once all the mating surfaces were cleaned I masked off the oil galley, crankcase and bores to protect them from the next step.



      Every bit of the original blue and gold paint was removed.



      Primed with self-etching primer after rinsing with lacquer thinner and blown dry.



      Waited until the primer had flash dried and then hit it with a base coat of the factory gold color.



      The heads will be painted separately with a primer and base coat as will the oil pan. Once installed the entire block will be given a top coat to match the way the engines were painted from the factory.

    13. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      12-05-2015 07:03 PM #112
      Went to a car gathering in Ypsilanti this morning and saw this gem. Anyone know what it's from?



      Got back to the shop and did some more blasting. The oil pan has a number of interior baffles that would trap abrasive, so I took great care to mask off the inside of the pan and its openings. The mask I use for the glass in my booth wasn't string enough so I covered that in Gorilla tape.



      Some things can be powder-coated and some can't without causing the parts to be fat. The horn lids have to snap over the horn, so they are getting painted. You can't powder-coat things that can't take too much heat. Anything that's soldered or glued can be a problem. The guy that does my vulcanized parts tells me that the rubber he uses starts to melt at 300°. Powder-coating is in the range of 350° and up, so we shouldn't do the vibration damper. The timing chain cover gets painted with a self-etching primer and a single coat of gold paint.



      The oil pan got the same treatment. Once the heads, oil pan, water pump and timing cover are on the engine it will get a top-coat of gold to cover the gaskets, just like the original paint scheme. The rest of the accessories and brackets will be powder-coated gloss black and bolted on with original zinc-plated bolts. The rest of the bolts get painted with the final gold coat.



      These three tubes are mounted to the frame to carry vacuum to the firewall from the engine-drive vacuum pump. Most period cars had wipers that were powered by vacuum. At a steady rate they work just fine, but during acceleration the manifold vacuum drops making the wipers just stop working. On the car they made the problem go away by mounting a piggyback vacuum pump driven off the same shaft as the fuel pump. It provides a constant vacuum flow under all conditions, as long as the engine is running.

      Some time ago the vacuum pump and full pump were disconnected and an electric fuel pump was installed, in kind of a dangerous way. It was used full-time. It worked great, but in the event of a split hose the engine would stop running, but the pump would keep pumping. In an accident you really want to shut off the fuel supply and a mechanical pump does that. We're going to keep the furl pump, but make it safer by installing a momentary-contact switch that will only work as long as you have your finger on the button. It will serve two functions. It will charge the fuel system on startup. These cars don't have a fuel check valve so they can siphon the gas all the way back to the tank, leaving the bowl nearly dry. Also, these carbs tend to evaporate fuel as there are fairly large holes that are open to atmosphere. The second reason is that in a crash you want the fuel to shut off, and that likely won't happen with any degree of safety. Many people install complicated oil-pressure-controlled relays for full-time fuel pump operation.

      I found out why nothing on the car worked off the pump as the bottom copper line was completely plugged. That would have defeated the wipers, spritzers and vacuum-operated antenna. None of the heater controls would wok, either. All complaints that this car came here with. Now we know why.


    14. Senior Member
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      12-05-2015 07:47 PM #113
      This is rapidly approaching everything but a full respray and interior, Barry. But man, it will drive brilliantly. Good show.

    15. Senior Member Iroczgirl's Avatar
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      12-05-2015 07:58 PM #114
      Barry, are you installing a fuel check valve? I'd highly recommend it. My '55 doesn't get driven very often, and it is so nice (and so much easier on the starter), to be able to jump in it and fire it up easily, even if it has been sitting for a month or more.
      Lots of VW stuff|Rare Scirocco parts!
      The family: '55 Ford 351C, '70 TR6 262Olds, '80 Rabbit AAZ, '84 C30 350, '88 Scirocco 9A, '97 Hardbody KA24E, '01 TJ 150AMC.
      Quote Originally Posted by Crimping Is Easy View Post
      You're always better off with a Citroën.™

    16. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      12-05-2015 08:00 PM #115
      Quote Originally Posted by Numbersix View Post
      This is rapidly approaching everything but a full respray and interior, Barry. But man, it will drive brilliantly. Good show.
      If my friend had nothing but time and money I'd have Jocko do the respray and Dan Kirkpatrick do the interior. I'm in his queue somewhere to have my Mark II's interior done. My posting his work on my '42 Lincoln Zephyr got him a bit of business. Now I have to wait in line.

    17. Banned LT1M21Vette's Avatar
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      12-05-2015 08:26 PM #116
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      Went to a car gathering in Ypsilanti this morning and saw this gem. Anyone know what it's from?


      2CV?

      edit: nope.

      Last edited by LT1M21Vette; 12-05-2015 at 08:47 PM.

    18. Member
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      12-05-2015 09:21 PM #117
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      Went to a car gathering in Ypsilanti this morning and saw this gem. Anyone know what it's from?

      BMW Isetta

    19. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      12-05-2015 09:23 PM #118
      Correct. It looked backward at first.

    20. Member 71DubBugBug's Avatar
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      12-06-2015 11:13 AM #119
      how do you de-carbon the pistons?
      also, how do you avoid damaging the cylinder walls? Do you just bring the piston all the way up?





      I was once worried about contaminants in the short block, so bathed it in 2-3 cans of brake clean or carb clean, don't remember, and then hooked up pressurized oil tank, and ran 10 quarts of oil through it before spinning it, but when it was all put together, no damage was done

    21. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      12-06-2015 11:37 AM #120
      Quote Originally Posted by 71DubBugBug View Post
      how do you de-carbon the pistons?
      also, how do you avoid damaging the cylinder walls? Do you just bring the piston all the way up?





      I was once worried about contaminants in the short block, so bathed it in 2-3 cans of brake clean or carb clean, don't remember, and then hooked up pressurized oil tank, and ran 10 quarts of oil through it before spinning it, but when it was all put together, no damage was done
      On the cylinders that had bad combustion the deposit was quite thick, and soft, while the cylinders that were running right had baked-on deposits. Those were remove with a razor blade and then scrubbed with the 3M magic fingers discs to make everything shine.

      Your fears are unfound about getting carbon into the crankcase as the rings, when installed properly, have a very tiny gap. Yes, we do the cylinder tops at TDC and then blow out the tiny gap between the piston and cylinder wall with 120 pounds of air pressure. Dropping the piston rivals a small remnants that just gets wiped off.

      The carbon deposits we noted and deposits in two previous changes of plugs all lead to the conclusion that we have no idea how this car seemingly ran so well. We think it's because it was running so rich that nothing could stop it. Further proof of that is the fact that this car has never had an operating choke, so it had to have run rich to even start.

      Jim will notice one thing about this car when he gets it back. It sure will be different.

    22. Senior Member Air and water do mix's Avatar
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      12-06-2015 12:12 PM #121
      Quote Originally Posted by sandrunner View Post
      BMW Isetta
      Dammit! Beaten.

      I'd never seen a bare chassis before, but the narrow rear track and steering shaft location made it nearly a sure bet.
      Quote Originally Posted by Boyz in da Park
      Proletariat, Bourgeoise - Everybody smellin' my potpourri...

    23. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      12-06-2015 12:18 PM #122
      Quote Originally Posted by Air and water do mix View Post
      I'd never seen a bare chassis before
      Nor I. I'm told that you access the engine through the interior and that only the American version had 4 wheels while the others had 3. Is that accurate?

      My FIL nearly decapitated himself in a new one of these. Took one for a test drive, loved the car, went back to the dealer, opened the door and used the steering wheel to pull his big body out of the car. Guess what happened.

    24. Senior Member Iroczgirl's Avatar
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      12-06-2015 12:43 PM #123
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      Nor I. I'm told that you access the engine through the interior and that only the American version had 4 wheels while the others had 3. Is that accurate?

      My FIL nearly decapitated himself in a new one of these. Took one for a test drive, loved the car, went back to the dealer, opened the door and used the steering wheel to pull his big body out of the car. Guess what happened.
      I can only imagine!

      I was always under the impression that the 3-wheeled Isetta was available in the UK market only, because of the favorable motorcycle license/tax thing. Same reason they had Morgan 3 wheelers. Any Isetta I ever came across in Germany had 4 wheels.
      Lots of VW stuff|Rare Scirocco parts!
      The family: '55 Ford 351C, '70 TR6 262Olds, '80 Rabbit AAZ, '84 C30 350, '88 Scirocco 9A, '97 Hardbody KA24E, '01 TJ 150AMC.
      Quote Originally Posted by Crimping Is Easy View Post
      You're always better off with a Citroën.™

    25. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      12-06-2015 12:45 PM #124
      Quote Originally Posted by Iroczgirl View Post
      I can only imagine!

      I was always under the impression that the 3-wheeled Isetta was available in the UK market only, because of the favorable motorcycle license/tax thing. Same reason they had Morgan 3 wheelers. Any Isetta I ever came across in Germany had 4 wheels.
      I may have misunderstood. I never saw a 3 wheeler.

    26. Senior Member Air and water do mix's Avatar
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      12-06-2015 12:53 PM #125
      I know that both 3 and 4 wheel versions exist and I believe that yes, that can be tied to motorcycle laws, but I don't know how consistent that would be.

      I can't say for sure, but I doubt that the 600 (the "big" one with a back seat!) had a 3-wheeler option. Does anyone know for sure?

      I'm glad your dad was OK! Was he hurt?
      Quote Originally Posted by Boyz in da Park
      Proletariat, Bourgeoise - Everybody smellin' my potpourri...

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