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    1. Member AlBeezy36's Avatar
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      03-16-2017 03:56 PM #151
      Quote Originally Posted by 10001110101 View Post
      The math is certainly right, but then you have to wonder if overdriving the alternator could do any damage. I could see slightly faster bearing wear and some additional heat as negatives. But with occasional use such as this car would see it should't really be an issue, just make sure your voltage regulator is doing its job.
      This is what I'm thinking. It's tough to get a gauge of how fast you can spin an alternator, but I've seen numbers like 18,000 rpm max. You would obviously expect shorter bearing life, etc winding it out that far for extended periods of time like on the track or drag racing, but this is a street car. It'll put around town with the occasional WOT fun.

      I plan on getting a 5250rpm (or close to) chip for my 6AL. If I get to a 3:1 ratio with a new pulley, it would mean the alt. would be spinning at 15,750rpm when I'm bouncing off my 6AL rev limiter. I generally grandma my stuff. If it ever does get wound out, it would be for seconds at a time. I think I'm gonna go for it

      Voltage regulator is working good. Needle stops moving up at 14v.

      EDIT: I guess the assumption I'm making is that nominal ratio is 3:1. If I get to 3:1 then my bearing life is nominal as well if that is typical from the factory. As-is at 2.36:1, my alternator will last till I'm eleventy-two.
      - Alex

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    3. Member 10001110101's Avatar
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      03-16-2017 04:13 PM #152
      Quote Originally Posted by AlBeezy36 View Post
      This is what I'm thinking. It's tough to get a gauge of how fast you can spin an alternator, but I've seen numbers like 18,000 rpm max. You would obviously expect shorter bearing life, etc winding it out that far for extended periods of time like on the track or drag racing, but this is a street car. It'll put around town with the occasional WOT fun.

      I plan on getting a 5250rpm (or close to) chip for my 6AL. If I get to a 3:1 ratio with a new pulley, it would mean the alt. would be spinning at 15,750rpm when I'm bouncing off my 6AL rev limiter. I generally grandma my stuff. If it ever does get wound out, it would be for seconds at a time. I think I'm gonna go for it

      Voltage regulator is working good. Needle stops moving up at 14v.

      EDIT: I guess the assumption I'm making is that nominal ratio is 3:1. If I get to 3:1 then my bearing life is nominal as well if that is typical from the factory. As-is at 2.36:1, my alternator will last till I'm eleventy-two.
      I would go for it. Bearings are cheap if they do wear out. Looking into LED bulbs wouldn't hurt either. More light output for lower wattage. Just make sure to find bulbs that scatter the light in a uniform way, a lot of cheaper bulbs have nasty hot spots in them.

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      03-16-2017 04:15 PM #153
      Quote Originally Posted by 10001110101 View Post
      The math is certainly right, but then you have to wonder if overdriving the alternator could do any damage. I could see slightly faster bearing wear and some additional heat as negatives. But with occasional use such as this car would see it should't really be an issue, just make sure your voltage regulator is doing its job.
      It wouldn't overdrive the alternator with a smaller crank and alternator pulley, though. It would have the same ratio as stock and everything else would be underdriven.

      Quote Originally Posted by 10001110101 View Post
      I would go for it. Bearings are cheap if they do wear out. Looking into LED bulbs wouldn't hurt either. More light output for lower wattage. Just make sure to find bulbs that scatter the light in a uniform way, a lot of cheaper bulbs have nasty hot spots in them.
      This.
      Quote Originally Posted by Boyz in da Park
      Proletariat, Bourgeoise - Everybody smellin' my potpourri...

    5. Member Ace_VR6's Avatar
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      03-16-2017 05:40 PM #154
      Quote Originally Posted by AlBeezy36 View Post
      Tis a valid point. For no other reason, to have full brightness brake/tail/head lights at idle with the fan on. I don't want to sit at a light in the middle of the night with dim bulbs waiting for green.
      This is EXACTLY why I suggested the 3g conversion earlier in this thread to you. My fox did the same exact thing and when that old taurus fan kicked in she would almost turn the lights off it felt like haha. Granted now I moved to dual contour fans which pull less initial fireup juice but all the lights are bright and happy at idle at a light with the fan kicking. I tried all those other High power aftermarket alt. and never had luck with them. I know you want to keep it stock appearing but this is more of a safety update.
      Quote Originally Posted by 04_GLI_ View Post
      Yeah still drove it home bout 60 miles. Didn't know it was a broken timming belt, drove fine just made a lil noise.

    6. Member AlBeezy36's Avatar
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      03-17-2017 06:28 PM #155
      Quote Originally Posted by Ace_VR6 View Post
      This is EXACTLY why I suggested the 3g conversion earlier in this thread to you. My fox did the same exact thing and when that old taurus fan kicked in she would almost turn the lights off it felt like haha. Granted now I moved to dual contour fans which pull less initial fireup juice but all the lights are bright and happy at idle at a light with the fan kicking. I tried all those other High power aftermarket alt. and never had luck with them. I know you want to keep it stock appearing but this is more of a safety update.
      I didn't ignore ya. I did see that powermaster makes a 3g in small ford. I already had my setup complete and wasn't done troubleshooting it, that's all

      Problem is, if we were to compare my alternator to powermaster's with the same pulley ratio, I believe I'd be in the same boat. Underdriven at idle. The powermaster benefits from its higher output, but it also comes with a 2.00 pulley, which would increase your at idle output. I've emailed back and forth with powermasters since your post trying to get one of their pulley's if it'll fit my .642 alternator shaft. So, thank you for the reminder. If not - as dumb as this sounds, I'm going to ask around about machining my pulley down or possibly reaming up the ID of a 2.00 pulley and bushing it to have a .642 ID. The only 2.00 pulleys I've found so far are around .669 ID.

      I'll keep hunting. Now to find a machinist with some spare time on their hands
      - Alex

    7. Member AlBeezy36's Avatar
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      03-20-2017 01:11 PM #156
      Quote Originally Posted by AlBeezy36 View Post
      I didn't ignore ya. I did see that powermaster makes a 3g in small ford. I already had my setup complete and wasn't done troubleshooting it, that's all

      Problem is, if we were to compare my alternator to powermaster's with the same pulley ratio, I believe I'd be in the same boat. Underdriven at idle. The powermaster benefits from its higher output, but it also comes with a 2.00 pulley, which would increase your at idle output. I've emailed back and forth with powermasters since your post trying to get one of their pulley's if it'll fit my .642 alternator shaft. So, thank you for the reminder. If not - as dumb as this sounds, I'm going to ask around about machining my pulley down or possibly reaming up the ID of a 2.00 pulley and bushing it to have a .642 ID. The only 2.00 pulleys I've found so far are around .669 ID.

      I'll keep hunting. Now to find a machinist with some spare time on their hands
      Well, Summit's website was incorrect and March never got back to me. All small Ford alternator shafts/pulleys are .669 and have been for the past 30 years, as confirmed by the guy who rebuilt my alternator and has been rebuilding starters/alternators locally forever.

      The 2.00 powermaster pulley I ordered to play with fit like a glove. Belt is a little on the long side, but I'm spinning faster at idle now. Still not overwhelmed with voltage, but it's an improvement.

      The pulley was only $15, so I may play with it some more and correct the belt length. Progress is progress
      - Alex

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      03-20-2017 07:55 PM #157
      Something to think about with the charging system is to make sure the alternator is grounding efficiently. Quick test have the car idling with the headlights on and take a jumper cable from the alternator case to the battery ground post (if it's under the hood) or on the battery ground where it comes off the engine block. You can get some weird voltage readings with some of the bracket set ups. Even the stuff that looks like just regular aluminum can have some clear coating on it that can insulate the alternator.

    9. Member AlBeezy36's Avatar
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      03-22-2017 12:17 PM #158
      Quote Originally Posted by NashGTI View Post
      Something to think about with the charging system is to make sure the alternator is grounding efficiently. Quick test have the car idling with the headlights on and take a jumper cable from the alternator case to the battery ground post (if it's under the hood) or on the battery ground where it comes off the engine block. You can get some weird voltage readings with some of the bracket set ups. Even the stuff that looks like just regular aluminum can have some clear coating on it that can insulate the alternator.
      I've actually never had a 1-wire alternator, but I assume that's what you're talking about. One wire comes off to battery and ground is handled through the bolts and brackets..

      Mine is externally regulated, so it has it's own separate ground wire to chassis. Your point is still valid and made me go back and double check my wire gages.

      After reviewing, I'm going to up my gage for both battery and ground off the alternator to 6ga. for 90Amps

      I have a 1.92dia. pulley on now with a shorter belt. Leaves me at about 17,500rpm alternator speed when my 6AL hits its new 5300 rev limiter. Once I've installed my bigger wires I'll give it another try. This is about as good as my charging situation gets without going up in alternator output, which I don't really need or want.
      - Alex

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      03-22-2017 12:34 PM #159
      I think he's talking about a good engine-to-chassis ground strap and possibly another for the alternator-to-engine, as the 1 wire setup is only the positive wire and it grounds through the brackets like every other alternator. He's just saying if you're running something like an aluminum alternator bracket (or coated steel for that matter) you might not have a good ground between the alternator and the engine, reducing voltage.

      In extreme cases I've heard of a throttle cable welding itself into place because the engine was grounding through it instead of a proper ground strap!
      Quote Originally Posted by Boyz in da Park
      Proletariat, Bourgeoise - Everybody smellin' my potpourri...

    11. Member 16volt's Avatar
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      03-22-2017 12:40 PM #160
      Quote Originally Posted by AlBeezy36 View Post
      I've actually never had a 1-wire alternator, but I assume that's what you're talking about. One wire comes off to battery and ground is handled through the bolts and brackets..

      Mine is externally regulated, so it has it's own separate ground wire to chassis. Your point is still valid and made me go back and double check my wire gages.

      After reviewing, I'm going to up my gage for both battery and ground off the alternator to 6ga. for 90Amps

      I have a 1.92dia. pulley on now with a shorter belt. Leaves me at about 17,500rpm alternator speed when my 6AL hits its new 5300 rev limiter. Once I've installed my bigger wires I'll give it another try. This is about as good as my charging situation gets without going up in alternator output, which I don't really need or want.
      I have some 0 gauge welding cable I just bought for a project if you wanted to test with/use it.

    12. Member AlBeezy36's Avatar
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      03-22-2017 01:20 PM #161
      Quote Originally Posted by Air and water do mix View Post
      I think he's talking about a good engine-to-chassis ground strap and possibly another for the alternator-to-engine, as the 1 wire setup is only the positive wire and it grounds through the brackets like every other alternator. He's just saying if you're running something like an aluminum alternator bracket (or coated steel for that matter) you might not have a good ground between the alternator and the engine, reducing voltage.

      In extreme cases I've heard of a throttle cable welding itself into place because the engine was grounding through it instead of a proper ground strap!
      No I gotcha. That all made sense. I'm just not sure that even applies to me as my alternator has it's own ground stud which is wired to my chassis ground. Any additional grounding experienced through the bolts would be gravy on top of the alternator's installed ground wire. The voltage regulator mounted to the side of the engine bay also has it's own ground. Still valid and very good info

      Concerning the engine ground - I didn't include a write-up about it, but I went back earlier and made sure my engine/trans is nicely grounded as well. The scary part is when I first got the car running years back, it had no ground strap from engine to chassis. I feel lucky I didn't burn this thing to the ground considering all the other garbage found.

      Stay tuned as I fumble through more automotive systems knowledge with only the internet to guide me

      Quote Originally Posted by 16volt View Post
      I have some 0 gauge welding cable I just bought for a project if you wanted to test with/use it.
      Thank you man, but I think 6ga. will be sufficient. 6ga. is recommended for up to 100amps constant, and my alternator is rated at 90amps. I also have 00ga. currently running from my starter relay under the hood to the battery in the trunk. The battery has it's own 00ga. ground to chassis in the trunk (neg lead). The starter relay has it's own ground as well, but Nash's comment got me thinking more - hence the up in size to 6ga. grounds, etc. Everything should be properly sized after I believe

      You guys are great. Thanks for watching
      - Alex

    13. Member AlBeezy36's Avatar
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      03-24-2017 02:53 PM #162
      Working through this and finding more places to make car safer.

      Any of you have a relocated battery and have installed a fuse or fusible link on main battery cable? Looks like people use 250A/300A here.

      Something like this:



      Was considering a fusible link on the alt (+) wire and (+) to dash wire as well.
      - Alex

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      03-24-2017 03:08 PM #163
      Quote Originally Posted by AlBeezy36 View Post
      No I gotcha. That all made sense. I'm just not sure that even applies to me as my alternator has it's own ground stud which is wired to my chassis ground. Any additional grounding experienced through the bolts would be gravy on top of the alternator's installed ground wire. The voltage regulator mounted to the side of the engine bay also has it's own ground. Still valid and very good info
      It sounds like you're well grounded then.

      Quote Originally Posted by AlBeezy36 View Post
      Working through this and finding more places to make car safer.

      Any of you have a relocated battery and have installed a fuse or fusible link on main battery cable? Looks like people use 250A/300A here.

      Something like this:



      Was considering a fusible link on the alt (+) wire and (+) to dash wire as well.
      That would certainly stop battery current, but don't forget that it will do little or nothing once the alternator is spinning.

      I don't know anything about their practical use, though. It may indeed be beneficial, but it may not in a real world scenario. Certainly you'd want a way to start the car if the thing blew, as you'd have nothing once that happened!
      Quote Originally Posted by Boyz in da Park
      Proletariat, Bourgeoise - Everybody smellin' my potpourri...

    15. Member AlBeezy36's Avatar
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      03-24-2017 03:26 PM #164
      Quote Originally Posted by Air and water do mix View Post
      It sounds like you're well grounded then.

      That would certainly stop battery current, but don't forget that it will do little or nothing once the alternator is spinning.

      I don't know anything about their practical use, though. It may indeed be beneficial, but it may not in a real world scenario. Certainly you'd want a way to start the car if the thing blew, as you'd have nothing once that happened!
      I'd put another fusible link between alternator and battery to do that. If my fuse on battery (+) has blown I do not want to reapply power or start the car until the short is addressed The fuse is to prevent the 15' length of 0/2 from turning into a giant fire stick.
      - Alex

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      03-24-2017 08:24 PM #165
      If you are actually using the ground point on the alternator just make sure everything is clean and you should be good to go, I've seen way to many cars that just assume the thing is good grounding through the alternator bracket to the engine and then never checking it. We had a Cougar that had a serpentine set up by Concept1 and the charging was all over the place as the alternator was only case ground through the coated brackets and was dropping almost 2 whole volts through ground.

    17. Member AlBeezy36's Avatar
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      03-29-2017 01:12 PM #166
      Sorry for the lack of action here. I'm a little burnt out (no pun intended) by this whole relocated battery deal.

      The battery is in the trunk because in college I thought that was cool and figured it would help with traction. I didn't understand how to correctly wire the battery relocation so I asked for help from a local mechanic. He helped me put the box in the trunk and run the 2/0 cables to the front leaving the rest same as stock. What I've since discovered is there are better ways to do what he did, I was ignorant, and here we are. Also, the reality is the car will not be drag raced on track (maybe once or twice if I get around to it), so there is really no benefit here besides space under the hood and aesthetics. Live and learn. Hindsight and all that..

      My research over the last few days has shown there are a couple ways that people will go about relocating the battery.

      1) Relocate battery in trunk, isolate wires as best as possible, drive smartly - what fuse?

      There are more people in this camp then you'd expect. Most people I've talked to in person have never heard of such a thing. They've also never seen a car burst into flames due to a short and don't see the point. Most aftermarket relocation kits do not include a starter relay or fuse, but some do.

      2) Those that have relocated to the trunk, then try to retroactively improve safety (where I am at)

      These guys are asking around on various forums what type/size fuse to use to splice into their existing setup. Fuse size varies depending on displacement, but the more I read and think, the more I realize my 460 is a special bird as it takes an abnormally large amount of current to crank, especially when hot. I've heard figures of +600A when hot. It's not possible for me to measure cranking amperage at this magnitude, so I'm kind of stuck in a guess/check method determining fuse size unless I can figure out more about my starter requirements. Maybe there is more to do there if one is stuck in this situation.

      3) Those which locate the battery and the ford style relay in the trunk, but with different wire routing to ensure the large cable (1/0 or larger) is powered only when the starter is cranked (where I'd like to be)

      These guys are all over the same forums where the same guys are asking about inline fuses (#2). They've seen 'countless' car fires and would never go forward without a fuse.

      The wiring recommended is as shown;

      Under Hood:



      In Trunk:



      So those are the options. The safe side of me wants to tear everything apart and rebuild my setup to Option #3, but the practical side of me says the car has been this way for 15 years with no issues. The risk is still there.

      I called around to some local experts to see what they thought. I called the guy at Lynnwood Electrical who has been doing auto electrics for 35 years. He falls into camp #1 and explained he's built numerous large cable, large draw devices for people and never installed a fuse. He also talked about his dual battery work truck which is in a similar situation. Large cables running here and there, no fuse. Drive or operate the equipment safely and you'll be fine, he said. I can dig that. He also mentioned that a number of OE's install main battery cables without fuses through the body. I later learned that our favored NA Miata is one of them. It has a constant hot lead from battery positive in the trunk to starter under hood:



      I next got a hold of Mark Hamilton at M.A.D. Electrical, who is the author of the hood/trunk battery relocation wiring diagrams above. Mark is an old school dude who operates his website sales via phone calls only. It took me 3 days to get him on the phone as it's either always busy or just rings. A little abnormal in today's world, but I can appreciate a little stubbornness if it means he deals directly with all tech/sales issues. Anyways, I quickly learned why it is hard to get a hold of him. He likes to talk. An hour and a half later I had heard a number of stories and anecdotes about how a number of OE's install a setup like mine without fuse and that there are numerous other hazards on these older cars which pose a greater risk, such as non collapsible steering columns, lack of electric fuel pump shut offs, etc. Basically, he rubbed my shoulders through the phone and I think I've come to my decision going forward...

      I'm going to continue making my system more robust by increasing gauges for the alternator and its ground, improving the overall car grounding, then put a future rebuild to #3 on the to-do list. In the mean time I've already inspected the total run of 2/0 wire and ensured it is a low-risk for direct short to body/frame. The wire going through the trunk pan is my biggest worry. A good rear end hit could sever the grommet and wire casing to cause a short, in which case I'd be in trouble. If the short was good enough, a fire could start or worst case the battery could explode and with it located pretty close to the fuel tank, it could be exciting. To mitigate the immediate concern, I will add a large inline fuse (2 in parallel if needed) to the power wire to ease my mind. Cutting the cable will happen eventually to eventually transition to #3 so there is no waste of expensive cable there. In the meantime there will be some peace of mind. Mark echoed A&W's recommendation of carrying extra fuses in case a hot start blew your fuse and left you stranded.

      Here is basically what my system looks like now, except my battery is 15' away in the trunk and my accessory relays are organized like I've already shown.



      Maybe someone reading this can save some time and headache and do the setup correctly the first time. I've learned a bunch with this part of the project. It's difficult to build a system that will evolve with your car over time. Making sure it is robust enough for future growth is important if you don't want to do this stuff over and over again. Starting down the right path from the get-go is the part I bobbled.

      Thanks for reading.

      PS: The electric booster is here. A couple gripes with it, but what else is new. I'm anal af. I'll post pics and improvements when I get the above electrical stuff wrapped up.
      Last edited by AlBeezy36; 03-29-2017 at 01:19 PM.
      - Alex

    18. Member AlBeezy36's Avatar
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      03-29-2017 01:24 PM #167
      I think the part about the NA miata is incorrect, actually. Starter looks to only be powered when switch is closed by ignition switch.
      - Alex

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      03-29-2017 01:41 PM #168
      In 45 years in the electrical business i've never seen a wire fail. I've seen abuse and I've seen poor installation, but I've never actually seen a wire fail on its own. Fires in cars are almost always because of bad ground connections, not from the power feeds. In the electrician world the rule of thumb is 2" of mechanical protection, so if you run the wires make sure they can't be snagged by running over a muffler or a stick. Using proper clamps eliminates the wire moving so there's little potential for rub through.

      I think this is again a problem with overthinking a problem. Manufacturers have been running constant hot wires without fusing for 100 years. My '55 Cab has a battery in the very front of the car and it runs directly to the starter in the rear. Power is tapped off there for the dashboard and accessories. No fusable link. The body is used as a ground. I saw voltage readings go up one volt on a six-volt system, just by properly cleaning and securing the ground connections. I always use those double-barbed star washers on ground connections. It's that important.

      If what you're talking about is required for racing, that's one thing, but simple common-sense installation would normally prevent the need for all that protection.

      Are you using an electric fuel pump?

    20. Member AlBeezy36's Avatar
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      03-29-2017 02:44 PM #169
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      In 45 years in the electrical business i've never seen a wire fail. I've seen abuse and I've seen poor installation, but I've never actually seen a wire fail on its own. Fires in cars are almost always because of bad ground connections, not from the power feeds. In the electrician world the rule of thumb is 2" of mechanical protection, so if you run the wires make sure they can't be snagged by running over a muffler or a stick. Using proper clamps eliminates the wire moving so there's little potential for rub through.

      I think this is again a problem with overthinking a problem. Manufacturers have been running constant hot wires without fusing for 100 years. My '55 Cab has a battery in the very front of the car and it runs directly to the starter in the rear. Power is tapped off there for the dashboard and accessories. No fusable link. The body is used as a ground. I saw voltage readings go up one volt on a six-volt system, just by properly cleaning and securing the ground connections. I always use those double-barbed star washers on ground connections. It's that important.

      If what you're talking about is required for racing, that's one thing, but simple common-sense installation would normally prevent the need for all that protection.

      Are you using an electric fuel pump?
      Thanks Barry, your experience is more of the shoulder rubbing I need. Overthinking is an understatement at this point. The problem is my lack of electrical experience. I'm using the internet as my guidance, and (brace for it) there is a ton of nonsense out there. I'm trying to use best judgement as when to zig or zag, but this seemed like something worth sweating. More experienced people (5 now, you included) are saying otherwise. It's tough to discern whether the people saying cars burn all the time are full of **** or people saying you don't need the fuse are. As someone who is learning, it can be daunting. Especially when you're trying to document it and have it resemble something worth following (sorry everyone).

      I am not running an electric fuel pump. He mentioned those features as safety hazards as they were just common at the time, according to him.

      Does your cab by chance have power wire feeding through holes with grommets or is it wrapped and tucked within a channel or similar?

      When you were rear-ended, was there anything you learned that you would incorporate safety wise going forward, originality be-damned? /thread derail
      - Alex

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      03-29-2017 03:18 PM #170
      for what its worth - RR being british and all that - the silver shadow has a trunk mounted battery with a large gauge cable going to the semi truck sized non-gear-reduction starter at the front of the car. cable runs through grommets and is tied down every so often with clamps under the car, run near the main brake line and fuel line routing area.

      anyway i think youre overthinking this

      assuming the starter wasnt running at the time, think about how much damage you could do before your enormous starter fuse blew. theres really no point IMO. and itd be nuts to run a huge starter feed - fused - and another alternator return along side that.

    22. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      03-29-2017 03:36 PM #171
      Quote Originally Posted by AlBeezy36 View Post
      Does your cab by chance have power wire feeding through holes with grommets or is it wrapped and tucked within a channel or similar?

      When you were rear-ended, was there anything you learned that you would incorporate safety wise going forward, originality be-damned? /thread derail
      The center tunnel on old Porsches is the pathway for fuel, electrical, cabling, brake lines and shifter mechanism. There's a lot going on, but everything co-exists when everything is properly restrained. Grommets are always a good idea, but cabling should be installed with enough clamps where it won't move.

      Yes. Two things. Lap belts are far better than no belts, but shoulder/lap belts are better than just lap belts. Second, I learned that there needs to be a long rubber hose in the filler neck of the gas tank. The tank had a pipe extension about 12" long and the gas filler tube, connected to the fender, about 8" long connected by a rubber hose. The metal tube ends were about 1/2" apart. When the semi ran up my rear fender it crushed the filler port and probably started the fire. Had the entire 20" been rubber instead of steel there likely would have been containment. As it was, 25 gallons of premium gasoline spewed onto the August-singed grasses 300 feet off the freeway. We were very fortunate to have survived.





      Not much left of the truck, either. The semi driver literally walked away. Injured, but walking.


    23. Senior Member
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      03-29-2017 04:38 PM #172
      Quote Originally Posted by AlBeezy36 View Post
      Does your cab by chance have power wire feeding through holes with grommets or is it wrapped and tucked within a channel or similar?
      Certainly my (and over 21 million more) Beetles did just that, as the battery is under the back seat. It passes through the pan at the back with a very large grommet and it's good for at least a few decades. The pic makes the hole look tiny, but after stretching it fits over the cable. I've seen Beetles burn, but only for gasoline fires, never for electrical reason. That's not to say it can't or won't happen, but I haven't seen it.

      As Barry said, keep everything buttoned down and use grommets and you'll probably be fine for many years. If you tear into it in the future another layer of safety certainly wouldn't hurt, though.
      Quote Originally Posted by Boyz in da Park
      Proletariat, Bourgeoise - Everybody smellin' my potpourri...

    24. Senior Member
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      03-29-2017 04:39 PM #173
      Quote Originally Posted by ValveCoverGasket View Post
      assuming the starter wasnt running at the time, think about how much damage you could do before your enormous starter fuse blew. theres really no point IMO. and itd be nuts to run a huge starter feed - fused - and another alternator return along side that.
      True, but if you somehow get a dead short it'll pop and cut power, even while tucked into the garage.
      Quote Originally Posted by Boyz in da Park
      Proletariat, Bourgeoise - Everybody smellin' my potpourri...

    25. Member
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      03-29-2017 09:28 PM #174
      From the sound of things, it sounds like you ran positive and negative cables from the battery to the front, if you did, don't bother. I've seen that so many times and it confuses the hell out of me, especially on something like the Galaxy with a full frame.

      If it were me, the way I'd do it, and the way I've done it, is put a breaker back by the battery then run a single hot wire up to the starter relay. Something like this.

      https://powerwerx.com/resettable-cir...FU0lgQodHKsP4Q



      From the starter relay branch your power out to the vehicle there, power the fuse block or headlight switch or Ammeter or however you have it set up from the starter relay and then hook your hot lead from the alternator to there as well. Ground wire from the engine to the frame, body to frame, frame to battery in the trunk.

      Realistically, loads of vehicles, like almost every one on the road, doesn't have a protected wire to the starter/relay. Keep the cable high and tight and there is little chance of it ever being a problem. Do be mindful of routing though, moving cables will rub through, it should go without saying but stay away from moving parts.

      Did work on a 1947 Buick someone had loaded 1970s suspension under and relocated the battery to the trunk, they ran the battery cables (positive and negative again) THROUGH one of the rear coil springs.

    26. Member AlBeezy36's Avatar
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      Rabbit, 911, 2002, and a Galaxie
      03-30-2017 12:12 AM #175
      You guys are great. Thank you for all the sharing. Barry, those pics are terrifying. Your comments remind me that the Galaxie has lap belts as well. One more thing to keep my 'issue' in perspective.

      I'll let the fear thing go. I think part of me was a little embarrassed that I had this problem at all. It's good to know that most guys can go through this

      VCG, the 'ideal' setup I was showing has a big wire to the starter which is only powered when cranked. There is no fuse on the starter lead. Another much smaller fused lead is what connects to your distribution block under the hood. The alternator would be attached to this same dist. block with a short run. It's just some piece of mind, but you're right, it's a few more wires running the length of the frame.

      Nash, those are trick. If nothing else those could be a good anti-theft device or easy battery disconnect. My battery is grounded straight to the frame beneath the battery thankfully. Power and ground is 2/0 which is also nice. The guy unfortunately used pull rivets to attach the insulated clamps which will make improvements in isolating the big cable difficult, but I'll make it work. Engine also has it's own seperate ground. Distribution center for everything under the hood also has it's own ground. What I don't have currently is body to frame grounds. I think I'll probably add one by the trunk and one under the hood based on everything you guys are saying.

      So in my backwards typical fashion, here are pics of stuff I've been doing and already discussed:

      Pulley fun. I settled on the copper nickel (or whatever it is) finish for my 1.92 pulley. No polished or chrome available. There are some other similar plated bits on the carb so it'll do.



      Brake booster stuff and master cylinder is here. The master is huge. I'll post more about this stuff when I'm there.



      6 ga. / 8 ga. / 10 ga.



      Here is what my distribution block looks like. It's partially taken apart here, and there is a lid with some wing nuts. It's not super heavy duty and all this improvement talk got me thinking this could be worked on as well. The main power is the 8 ga. wire which comes in from the right straight down from the starter relay above it. What's not shown is the two short splices needed to link the power and neg. posts together. It got to be a bit of a mess when all put together.



      Everything taken apart. The two splices required are the short squat runs.



      Here's a close-up of the box. The routing uses 1 & 2 for (+), 3 for switched (+), 4 & 5 for (-), and 6 is left unused. I ended up modifying the box to eliminate the short splices I was running to link posts and prepare for larger gauge cables for ground and power.



      The copper union is because I couldn't find copper plate locally. I tried a couple hardware stores on a Saturday so I wasn't trying super hard here. I made my own instead.





      It might look like the copper is wimpy compared to the 8 ga. power wire splice there, but the copper is .050 thick by .675 wide which is an equivalent cross section to 4 ga. wire which is larger than anything within the box (6 ga. max)

      I opened up all four openings in the box to allow the new 6 ga. wire coming off the alternator in and the box's new 6 ga. ground to chassis out. Alternator ground is now a matching 6 ga. wire going straight to chassis. A little overkill maybe, but if I ever go up in amperage, I'll be ready. The reworked opening is on the left, the original on the right.



      Prior dist. box ground next to upgraded wire.



      Prior alternator battery lead next to upgraded wire. Again a little overkill, but I can grow into it if I ever add a bigger stereo or whatever else. Who knows..



      Anyways, that's it for now. Thanks again everyone.

      - Alex

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